Jeff Bezos, fully Jeffrey Preston "Jeff" Bezos

Jeff
Bezos, fully Jeffrey Preston "Jeff" Bezos
1964

American Internet Entrepreneur, Founder and CEO of Amazon.com

Author Quotes

I went to Princeton specifically to study physics.

I'm a big fan of all-you-can-eat plans, because they're simpler for customers.

Millions of people were inspired by the Apollo Program. I was five years old when I watched Apollo 11 unfold on television, and without any doubt it was a big contributor to my passions for science, engineering, and exploration.

Strip malls are a symbol for marginal, low-experience stores that nobody really wants to go to. Over time, say within 10 years, maybe 15 percent of commerce will move online. Will that have a big impact on the physical world? Absolutely. What will that effect be? It will force stores to get better. The ones that don't get better will go by the wayside.

There are two kinds of companies, those that work to try to charge more and those that work to charge less. We will be the second.

We were hoping to build a small, profitable company. And of course, what we've done is build a large, unprofitable company.

You know, we love stories and we love narrative; we love to get lost in an author's world.

If there?s one reason we have done better than of our peers in the Internet space over the last six years, it is because we have focused like a laser on customer experience, and that really does matter, I think, in any business. It certainly matters online, where word of mouth is so very, very powerful.

I'm going to go do this crazy thing. I'm going to start this company selling books online.

My own view is that every company requires a long-term view.

Strip malls are history.

There are two ways to extend a business. Take inventory of what you're good at and extend out from your skills. Or determine what your customers need and work backward, even if it requires learning new skills. Kindle is an example of working backward.

We will continue to invest in systems, people and product expansion, each of which helps us better serve customers.

You want to look at what other companies are doing. It's very important not to be hermetically sealed. But you don't want to look at it as if, 'OK, we're going to copy that.' You want to look at it and say, 'That's very interesting. What can we be inspired to do as a result of that?' And then put your own unique twist on it.

If there's one reason we have done better than of our peers in the Internet space over the last six years, it is because we have focused like a laser on customer experience, and that really does matter.... It certainly matters online.

I'm not saying that advertising is going away. But the balance is shifting. If today the successful recipe is to put 70 percent of your energy into shouting about your service and 30 percent into making it great, over the next 20 years I think that's going to invert.

My view is there's no bad time to innovate.

Teachers, who are really good create that environment where you can be very satisfied by the process of learning. If you do something and you find it a very satisfying experience then you want to do more of it. The great teachers somehow convey in their very attitude and their words and their actions and everything they do that this is an important thing you're learning. You end up wanting to do more of it and more of it and more of it. That's a real talent some people have to convey the importance of that and to reflect it back to the students.

There'll always be serendipity involved in discovery.

We've done price elasticity studies, and the answer is always that we should raise prices. We don't do that, because we believe -- and we have to take this as an article of faith -- that by keeping our prices very, very low, we earn trust with customers over time, and that that actually does maximize free cash flow over the long term.

You want your customers to value your service.

If we can keep our competitors focused on us while we stay focused on the customer, ultimately we'll turn out all right.

I'm skeptical that the novel will be 're-invented.'

Obsess over customers.

That blank sheet of paper stage is one of the hardest stages, and one of the reasons it's hard is because at that stage there's nobody counting on you but yourself ... it's really just you, and you can quit any time. Nobody is going to care.

Author Picture
First Name
Jeff
Last Name
Bezos, fully Jeffrey Preston "Jeff" Bezos
Birth Date
1964
Bio

American Internet Entrepreneur, Founder and CEO of Amazon.com