John F. Kennedy, fully John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy

John F.
Kennedy, fully John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy
1917
1963

American Politician, 35th President of the United States, Assassinated

Author Quotes

I look forward to a great future for America—a future in which our country will match its
military strength with our moral strength, its wealth with our wisdom, its power with our
purpose.
I look forward to an America which will not be afraid of grace and beauty, which will protect
the beauty of our natural environment, which will preserve the great old American houses and
squares and parks of our national past, and which will build handsome and balanced cities for
our future.
I look forward to an America which commands respect throughout the world, not only or its
strength but for its civilization as well.

Peace is a daily, a weekly, a monthly process, gradually changing opinions, slowly eroding old barriers, quietly building new structures. And however undramatic the pursuit of peace, that pursuit must go on.

For the eyes of the world now look into space, to the moon and to the planets beyond, and we have vowed that we shall not see it governed by a hostile flag of conquest, but by a banner of freedom and peace. We have vowed that we shall not see space filled with weapons of mass destruction, but with instruments of knowledge and understanding.

If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.

Freedom is indivisible, and when one man is enslaved, all are not free.

The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. We need men who can dream of things that never were and ask "why not?".

Dante once said that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in a period of moral crisis, maintain their neutrality.

The path we have chosen for the present is full of hazards, as all paths are; but it is one of the most consistent with our character and our courage as a nation and our commitments around the world. The cost of freedom is always high — but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and this is the path of surrender or submission. Our goal is not victory of might but the vindication of right — not peace at the expense of freedom, but both peace and freedom, here in this hemisphere and, we hope, around the world. God willing, that goal will be achieved.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie — deliberate, contrived and dishonest — but the myth — persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic.

I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth. No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish.

For of those to whom much is given, much is required. And when at some future date the high court of history sits in judgment on each of us—recording whether in our brief span of service we fulfilled our responsibilities to the state—our success or failure, in whatever office we hold, will be measured by the answers to four questions: First, were we truly men of courage—with the courage to stand up to one’s enemies—and the courage to stand up, when necessary, to one’s associates—the courage to resist public pressure, as well as private greed? Secondly, were we truly men of judgment—with perceptive judgment of the future as well as the past—of our mistakes as well as the mistakes of others—with enough wisdom to know what we did not know and enough candor to admit it? Third, were we truly men of integrity—men who never ran out on either the principles in which we believed or the men who believed in us—men whom neither financial gain nor political ambition could ever divert from the fulfillment of our sacred trust? Finally, were we truly men of dedication—with an honor mortgaged to no single individual or group, and comprised of no private obligation or aim, but devoted solely to serving the public good and the national interest? Courage—judgment—integrity—dedication—these are the historic qualities,with God’s help, characterize our Government’s conduct in the 4 stormy years that lie ahead.

If this nation is to be wise as well as strong, if we are to achieve our destiny, then we need more new ideas for more wise men reading more good books in more public libraries. These libraries should be open to all — except the censor. We must know all the facts and hear all the alternatives and listen to all the criticisms. Let us welcome controversial books and controversial authors. For the Bill of Rights is the guardian of our security as well as our liberty.

A man does what he must — in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers, and pressures — and that is the basis of all human morality.

We prefer world law in the age of self-determination to world war in the age of mass extermination.

We cannot expect that all nations will adopt like systems, for conformity is the jailer of freedom and the enemy of growth.

Victory has a thousand fathers, but defeat is an orphan.

Those who dare to fail miserably can achieve greatly.

Things do not happen. Things are made to happen.

The very word 'secrecy' is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.

The path we have chosen for the present is full of hazards, as all paths are. The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission.

The courage of life is often a less dramatic spectacle than the courage of a final moment; but it is no less a magnificent mixture of triumph and tragedy.

The best road to progress is freedom's road.

The basic problems facing the world today are not susceptible to a military solution.

Our growing softness, our increasing lack of physical fitness, is a menace to our security.

Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.

Author Picture
First Name
John F.
Last Name
Kennedy, fully John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy
Birth Date
1917
Death Date
1963
Bio

American Politician, 35th President of the United States, Assassinated