Joseph Fletcher, fully Joseph Francis Fletcher

Joseph
Fletcher, fully Joseph Francis Fletcher
1905
1991

American Episcopalian Priest, Philosopher recognized for his work in Moral Theory, Applied Ethics and Consequentialist Moral Reasoning

Author Quotes

The true opposite of love is not hate but indifference. Hate, bad as it is, at least treats a neighbor as a thou, whereas indifference turns the neighbor into an it, a thing. That is why we may say there is actually one thing worse than evil itself and that is indifference to evil. In human relations the nadir of morality, the lowest point as far as Christian ethics is concerned, is manifest in the phrase, 'I could care less.'

The top 10% of the people who are most creative, constructive and thoughtful, do not have much to do with churches. To them the canons of reason come first, making faith secondary and questionable.

Let no debt remain outstanding, except the continuing debt to love one another, for he who loves his fellow man has fulfilled the law.

If the end does not justify the means, what does? The answer is, obviously, Nothing!

Ethics critically examines values and how they are to be acted out; but whether they are acted out or not, loyalty to them depends on character or personal quality, and so it follows that the quality of medicine depends on the character of its clinicians.

We ought to love people and use things, the essence of immorality is to love things and use people.

We need to educate people to the idea that the quality of life is more important than mere length of life. Our cultural tradition holds that life has absolute value, but that is really not good enough anymore. Sometimes, no life is better.

Calamity is man’s true touchstone.

Man is his own star, and that soul that can be honest, is the only perfect man.

Author Picture
First Name
Joseph
Last Name
Fletcher, fully Joseph Francis Fletcher
Birth Date
1905
Death Date
1991
Bio

American Episcopalian Priest, Philosopher recognized for his work in Moral Theory, Applied Ethics and Consequentialist Moral Reasoning