Kaushitaki Upanishad

Kaushitaki
Upanishad
c. 600
300 B.C.

Sacred Philosophical Hindu Literature

Author Quotes

Then he said: ?I am the breathing spirit (pr??a), the intelligential self (praj¤?tman). As such), reverence me as life (?yus), as immortality. Life is the breathing spirit. The breathing spirit, verily, is life. The breathing spirit, indeed, is immortality. For, as long as the breathing spirit remains in this body, so long is there life. For indeed, with the breathing spirit in this11 world one obtains immortality; with intelligence, true conception (samkalpa). So he who reverences me as life, as immortality, reaches the full term of life in this world; he obtains immortality, indestructibility (ak?iti) in the heavenly world (svarga-loka).?

Then he said: ?Those who, verily, depart from this world?to the moon, in truth, they all go. During the earlier half it thrives on their breathing spirits (pr??a); with the latter half1 it causes them to be reproduced. This, verily, is the door of the heavenly world?that is, the moon. Whoever answers it, him it lets go further. But whoever answers it not, him, having become rain, it rains down here. Either as a worm, or as a moth, or as a fish, or as a bird, or as a lion, or as a wild boar,2 or as a snake, or as a tiger, or as a person, or as some other in this or that condition, he is born again here according to his deeds (karman), according to his knowledge.

To him he says: ?Who am I?? He should say: ?The Real.? ?What is that, namely the Real (satyam)?? ?Whatever is other than the sense-organs (deva) and the vital breaths (pr??a)?that is the actual (sat). But as for the sense-organs and the vital breaths?that is the yon (tyam). This is expressed by this word ?satyam? (?the Real?). It is as extensive as this world-all. You are this world-all.?

From every limb of mine you come! Right from my heart you are born forth! You are myself (?tman), indeed, my son! So live a hundred autumns long!

In the sun?the Great, in the moon?Food, in lightning?Truth, in thunder?Sound, in wind?Indra Vaiku??ha, in space?the Plenum, in fire?the Vanquisher, in water?Brilliance (tejas)? In the mirror?the Counterpart, in the shadow?the Double, in the echo?Life (asu), in sound?Death, in sleep?Yama [Lord of the dead], in the body?Praj?pati [Lord of Creation], in the right eye?Speech, in the left eye?Truth.

That heart of mine of contour fair (sus?ma) which in the moon in heaven rests?I ween myself aware of that! May I not weep for children?s ill!

That which in thy heart, O [dame] with fair-parted hair, is placed?within Praj?pati?Therewith, O Queen of immortality, may you not come on children?s ill!

The breathing spirit (pr??a) is Brahma??thus indeed was Kaush?taki wont to say. Of this same breathing spirit as Brahma, verily, indeed, the mind (manas) is the messenger; the eye, the watchman; the ear, the announcer; speech, the handmaid. He who, verily, indeed, knows the mind as the messenger of this breathing spirit, [i. e.] of Brahma, becomes possessed of a messenger; he who knows the eye as the watchman, becomes possessed of a watchman; he who knows the ear as the announcer, becomes possessed of an announcer; he who knows speech as the handmaid, becomes possessed of a handmaid. To this same breathing spirit as Brahma, verily, all these divinities without his begging bring offering. Likewise, indeed, to this same breathing spirit all beings without his begging bring offering. Of him who knows this, the secret doctrine (upani?ad) is: ?One should not beg.? It is as if, having begged of a village and not having received, one were to sit down, saying: ?I would not eat anything given from here!? and then those very ones who formerly refused him invite him, saying: ?Let us give to you!? Such is the virtue (dharma) of the non-beggar. Charitable people, however, address him, saying: ?Let us give to you!?

Then he becomes unitary in this Pr??a. Then speech together with all names goes to it; the eye together with all forms goes to it; the ear together with all sounds goes to it; the mind (manas) together with all thoughts goes to it.

Either as a worm, or as a moth, or as a fish, or as a bird, or as a snake, or as a tiger, or as a person, or as some other in this or that condition, he is born again here according to his deeds, according to his knowledge.

Speech is; not what one should desire to understand. One should know the speaker.

Author Picture
First Name
Kaushitaki
Last Name
Upanishad
Birth Date
c. 600
Death Date
300 B.C.
Bio

Sacred Philosophical Hindu Literature