L. Frank Baum, fully Lyman Frank Baum

L. Frank
Baum, fully Lyman Frank Baum
18546
1919

American Children's Book Author, best known for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Author Quotes

There were forty wolves, and forty times a wolf was killed, so that at last they all lay dead in a heap before the Woodman.

To be individual, my friends, to be different from others, is the only way to become distinguished from the common herd. Let us be glad, therefore, that we differ from one another in form and in disposition. Variety is the spice of life, and we are various enough to enjoy one another's society; so let us be content.

We reached by a trap door in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole. When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side.

Why are you Ojo the Unlucky? asked the tin man. Because I was born on a Friday. Friday is not unlucky, declared the Emperor. It's just one of seven days. Do you suppose all the world becomes unlucky one-seventh of the time? It was the thirteenth day of the month, said Ojo. Thirteen! Ah, that is indeed a lucky number, replied the Tin Woodman. All my good luck seems to happen on the thirteenth. I suppose most people never notice the good luck that comes to them with the number 13, and yet if the least bit of bad luck falls on that day, they blame it to the number, and not to the proper cause.

You have some queer friends, Dorothy,' she said. The queerness doesn't matter, so long as they're friends,' was the answer

Islandish.

It seems unfortunate that strong people are usually so disagreeable and overbearing that no one cares for them. In fact, to be different from your fellow creatures is always a misfortune.

Modern education includes morality; therefore the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder-tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.

No, my head is quite empty, answered the Woodman. But once I had brains, and a heart also; so, having tried them both, I should much rather have a heart.

Oh, no, my dear; I'm really a very good man, but I'm a very bad Wizard, I must admit.

She was awakened by a shock, so sudden and severe that if Dorothy had not been lying on the soft bed she might have been hurt. As it was, the jar made her catch her breath and wonder what had happened; and Toto put his cold little nose into her face and whined dismally. Dorothy sat up and noticed that the house was not moving; nor was it dark, for the bright sunshine came in at the window, flooding the little room. She sprang from her bed and with Toto at her heels ran and opened the door.

The brain is the only thing worth having in this world, no matter if you are crows or men.

The reason most people are bad is because they do not try to be good. Now, the Nome King had never tried to be good, so he was very bad indeed.

There were four walls, a floor and a roof, which made one room; and this room contained a rusty looking cook-stove, a cupboard for the dishes, a table, three or four chairs, and the beds. Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner. There was no garret at all, and no cellar--except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path. It was reached by a trap door in the middle of the floor, from which a ladder led down into the small, dark hole. When Dorothy stood in the doorway and looked around, she could see nothing but the great gray prairie on every side. Not a tree nor a house broke the broad sweep of flat country that reached to the edge of the sky in all directions. The sun had baked the plowed land into a gray mass, with little cracks running through it. Even the grass was not green, for the sun had burned the tops of the long blades until they were the same gray color to be seen everywhere. Once the house had been painted, but the sun blistered the paint and the rains washed it away, and now the house was as dull and gray as everything else. When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife. The sun and wind had changed her, too. They had taken the sparkle from her eyes and left them a sober gray; they had taken the red from her cheeks and lips, and they were gray also. She was thin and gaunt, and never smiled now. When Dorothy, who was an orphan, first came to her, Aunt Em had been so startled by the child's laughter that she would scream and press her hand upon her heart whenever Dorothy's merry voice reached her ears; and she still looked at the little girl with wonder that she could find anything to laugh at. Uncle Henry never laughed. He worked hard from morning till night and did not know what joy was. He was gray also, from his long beard to his rough boots, and he looked stern and solemn, and rarely spoke. It was Toto that made Dorothy laugh, and saved her from growing as gray as her other surroundings. Toto was not gray; he was a little black dog, with long silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose. Toto played all day long, and Dorothy played with him, and loved him dearly. Today, however, they were not playing. Uncle Henry sat upon the doorstep and looked anxiously at the sky, which was even grayer than usual. Dorothy stood in the door with Toto in her arms, and looked at the sky too. Aunt Em was washing the

to console the girl for the loss of her feathered friend.

Well, I cannot claim any great experience in life,' the Saw-Horse answered for himself; 'but I seem to learn very quickly, and often it occurs to me that I know more than any of those around me.' 'Perhaps you do,' said the Emperor; 'for experience does not always mean wisdom.

Why didn't the Eskimo keep it? she asked, looking at the Magnet with interest. He got tired of being loved and longed for someone to hate him. So he gave me the Magnet and the very next day a grizzly bear ate him. Wasn't he sorry then? she inquired. He didn't say, replied the shaggy man,

You may have noticed that if one has money without brains, he cannot use it to advantage; but if one has brains without money, they will enable him to live comfortably to the end of his days.

It aspires to being a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heartaches and nightmares are left out.

It was a good fight, friend.

Mombi was not exactly a Witch, because the Good Witch who ruled that part of the Land of Oz had forbidden any other Witch to exist in her dominions. So Tip's guardian, however much she might aspire to working magic, realized it was unlawful to be more than a Sorceress, or at most a Wizardess.

Nobody gets in to see the wizard. Not nobody.

One can be ugly in looks, but lovely in disposition.

Since no thief, however skillful, can rob one of knowledge, and that is why knowledge is the best and safest treasure to acquire.

The Cowardly Lion laughed, and said: I have always thought myself very big and terrible; yet such little things as flowers came near to killing me, and such small animals as mice have saved my life. How strange it all is! But,

Author Picture
First Name
L. Frank
Last Name
Baum, fully Lyman Frank Baum
Birth Date
18546
Death Date
1919
Bio

American Children's Book Author, best known for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz