Lewis Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

Lewis
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
1832
1898

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass

Author Quotes

A Postscript is a very useful invention: but it is not meant... to contain the real gist of the letter: it serves rather to throw into the shade any little matter we do not wish to make a fuss about.

Don?t repeat yourself. When once you have said your say, fully and clearly, on a certain point, and have failed to convince your friend, drop that subject: to repeat your arguments, all over again, will simply lead to his doing the same; and so you will go on, like a Circulating Decimal. Did you ever know a Circulating Decimal come to an end?

Don?t try to have the last word! How many a controversy would be nipped in the bud, if each was anxious to let the other have the last word! Never mind how telling a rejoinder you leave unuttered: never mind your friend?s supposing that you are silent from lack of anything to say: let the thing drop, as soon as it is possible without discourtesy: remember "speech is silvern, but silence is golden"!

If doubtful whether to end with "yours faithfully," or "yours truly," or "yours most truly," &c. (there are at least a dozen varieties, before you reach "yours affectionately"), refer to your correspondent?s last letter, and make your winding-up at least as friendly as his; in fact, even if a shade more friendly, it will do no harm!

If it should ever occur to you to write, jestingly, in dispraise of your friend, be sure you exaggerate enough to make the jesting obvious: a word spoken in jest, but taken as earnest, may lead to very serious consequences. I have known it to lead to the breaking-off of a friendship.

If the Letter is to be in answer to another, begin by getting out that other letter and reading it through, in order to refresh your memory, as to what it is you have to answer... A great deal of the bad writing in the world comes simply from writing too quickly.

If your friend makes a severe remark, either leave it unnoticed, or make your reply distinctly less severe: and if he makes a friendly remark, tending towards "making up" the little difference that has arisen between you, let your reply be distinctly more friendly. If, in picking a quarrel, each party declined to go more than three-eighths of the way, and if, in making friends, each was ready to go five-eighths of the way ? why, there would be more reconciliations than quarrels!

Since I have possessed a ?Wonderland Stamp Case?, Life has been bright and peaceful, and I have used no other. I believe the Queen?s laundress uses no other.

When you have written a letter that you feel may possibly irritate your friend, however necessary you may have felt it to so express yourself, put it aside till the next day. Then read it over again, and fancy it addressed to yourself. This will often lead to your writing it all over again, taking out a lot of the vinegar and pepper, and putting in honey instead, and thus making a muchmore palatable dish of it!

Thy loving smile will surely hail the love-gift of a fairy tale.

We called him Tortoise because he taught us.

What curious attitudes he goes into!' (For the messenger kept skipping up and down, and wriggling like an eel, as he came along, with his great hands spread out like fans on each side.)'Not at all,' said the King. 'He's an Anglo-Saxon Messenger-and those are Anglo-Saxon attitudes. He only does them when he's happy.

When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark, and will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark: but, when the tide rises and sharks are around, his voice has a timid and tremulous sound.

Yes, that's it! Said the Hatter with a sigh, it's always tea time.

You're entirely bonkers. But I'll tell you a secret. All the best people are.

'Tis a secret: none knows how it comes, how it goes: but the name of the secret is Love!

Well that was the silliest tea party I ever went to! I am never going back there again!

What do you suppose is the use of a child without any meaning? Even a joke should have some meaning-- and a child's more important than a joke, I hope. You couldn't deny that, even if you tried with both hands.

When you are describing a shape, or sound, or tint; don't state the matter plainly, But put it in a hint; and learn to look at all things With a sort of mental squint.

Yet still to choose a brat like you, to haunt a man of forty-two, was no great compliment!

You're mad, bonkers, completely off your head. But I'll tell you a secret. All the best people.

Tis so,' said the Duchess: 'and the moral of that is- Oh, 'tis love, 'tis love, that makes the world go round!' 'Somebody said,' Alice whispered, 'that it's done by everybody minding their own business!' 'Ah, well! It means much the same thing,' said the Duchess.

Well that's it: if you don't think, you shouldn't talk!

What does it matter where my body happens to be?' he said. 'My mind goes on working all the same.

Whenever the horse stopped (which it did very often), he fell off in front; and, whenever it went on again (which it generally did rather suddenly), he fell off behind. Otherwise he kept on pretty well, except that he had a habit of now and then falling off sideways; and, as he generally did this on the side on which Alice was walking, she soon found that it was the best plan not to walk quite close to the horse.

Author Picture
First Name
Lewis
Last Name
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
Birth Date
1832
Death Date
1898
Bio

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass