Lewis Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

Lewis
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
1832
1898

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass

Author Quotes

A Postscript is a very useful invention: but it is not meant... to contain the real gist of the letter: it serves rather to throw into the shade any little matter we do not wish to make a fuss about.

Don?t repeat yourself. When once you have said your say, fully and clearly, on a certain point, and have failed to convince your friend, drop that subject: to repeat your arguments, all over again, will simply lead to his doing the same; and so you will go on, like a Circulating Decimal. Did you ever know a Circulating Decimal come to an end?

Don?t try to have the last word! How many a controversy would be nipped in the bud, if each was anxious to let the other have the last word! Never mind how telling a rejoinder you leave unuttered: never mind your friend?s supposing that you are silent from lack of anything to say: let the thing drop, as soon as it is possible without discourtesy: remember "speech is silvern, but silence is golden"!

If doubtful whether to end with "yours faithfully," or "yours truly," or "yours most truly," &c. (there are at least a dozen varieties, before you reach "yours affectionately"), refer to your correspondent?s last letter, and make your winding-up at least as friendly as his; in fact, even if a shade more friendly, it will do no harm!

If it should ever occur to you to write, jestingly, in dispraise of your friend, be sure you exaggerate enough to make the jesting obvious: a word spoken in jest, but taken as earnest, may lead to very serious consequences. I have known it to lead to the breaking-off of a friendship.

If the Letter is to be in answer to another, begin by getting out that other letter and reading it through, in order to refresh your memory, as to what it is you have to answer... A great deal of the bad writing in the world comes simply from writing too quickly.

If your friend makes a severe remark, either leave it unnoticed, or make your reply distinctly less severe: and if he makes a friendly remark, tending towards "making up" the little difference that has arisen between you, let your reply be distinctly more friendly. If, in picking a quarrel, each party declined to go more than three-eighths of the way, and if, in making friends, each was ready to go five-eighths of the way ? why, there would be more reconciliations than quarrels!

Since I have possessed a ?Wonderland Stamp Case?, Life has been bright and peaceful, and I have used no other. I believe the Queen?s laundress uses no other.

When you have written a letter that you feel may possibly irritate your friend, however necessary you may have felt it to so express yourself, put it aside till the next day. Then read it over again, and fancy it addressed to yourself. This will often lead to your writing it all over again, taking out a lot of the vinegar and pepper, and putting in honey instead, and thus making a muchmore palatable dish of it!

To Her, whose children's smiles fed the narrator's fancy and were his rich reward: from the Author.

Well! thought Alice to herself. After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down-stairs! How brave they?ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn?t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house! (Which was very likely true.)

What is his sorrow?' She asked the Gryphon. And the Gryphon answered, very nearly in the same words as before, 'It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know'.

Which way you ought to go depends on where you want to get to.

You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.

To me it seems that to give happiness is a far nobler goal that to attain it: and that what we exist for is much more a matter of relations to others than a matter of individual progress: much more a matter of helping others to heaven than of getting there ourselves.

Well! What are you? said the Pigeon. I can see you're trying to invent something!

'What is the use of a book', thought Alice, 'without pictures or conversations?'

Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I'll come up; if not, I'll stay down here till I'm someone else.

You could not see a cloud, because No cloud was in the sky: No birds were flying overhead -- There were no birds to fly.

To suffering or fear. For all that's bad, or mean or sad, you have no mind,

Well, I never heard it before, but it sounds uncommon nonsense.

What mattered it to her just then that the rushes had begun to fade and to lose all their scent and beauty, from the very moment that she picked them? Even real scented rushes, you know, last only a very little while-- and these, being dream-rushes, melted away almost like snow, as they lay in heaps at her feet-- but Alice hardly noticed this, there were so many other curious things to think about.

Who ARE You? This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, I--I hardly know, sir, just at present-- at least I know who I WAS when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.

You couldn't have it if you DID want it.

To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said 'I've a sceptre in hand, I've a crown on my head. Let the Looking-Glass creatures, whatever they be, Come and dine with the Red Queen, the White Queen, and me.

Author Picture
First Name
Lewis
Last Name
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
Birth Date
1832
Death Date
1898
Bio

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass