Lewis Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

Lewis
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
1832
1898

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass

Author Quotes

Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!

One can't believe impossible things. I daresay you haven't had much practice, said the Queen. When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.

Reeling and Writhing of course, to begin with,' the Mock Turtle replied, 'and the different branches of arithmetic-ambition, distraction, uglification, and derision.

Ever drifting down the stream, lingering in the golden gleam. Life, what is it but a dream?

He thought he saw a Banker's Clerk descending from the bus: He looked again, and found it was

I can?t believe THAT! said Alice. Can?t you? said the Queen in a pitying tone. Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes. Alice laughed. There?s no use trying, she said, one can?t believe impossible things. I daresay you haven?t had much practice, said the Queen. When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why sometimes I believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast!

I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it.

I quite agree with you, said the Duchess; and the moral of that is??Be what you would seem to be??or, if you?d like it put more simply??Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.

If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.

I'll try if I know all the things I used to know. Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is - oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate!

It is a very inconvenient habit of kittens (Alice had once made the remark) that, whatever you say to them, they always purr: If they would only purr for 'yes,' and mew for 'no,; or any rule of that sort, she had said, so that one could keep up a conversation! But how can you talk with a person if they always say the same thing?

It's all his fancy, that: he hasn't got no sorrow, you know. Come on!

MAD HATTER: Would you like a little more tea? Alice: Well, I haven't had any yet, so I can't very well take more. MARCH HARE: Ah, you mean you can't very well take less. MAD HATTER: Yes. You can always take more than nothing.

Now, what am I to do with this creature when I get it home? When it grunted again, so violently, that she looked down into its face in some alarm. This time there could be no mistake about it: it was neither more nor less than a pig, and she felt that it would be quite absurd for her to carry it any further. | So she set the little creature down, and felt quite relieved to see it trot away quietly into the wood. If it had grown up, she said to herself, it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes a rather handsome pig, I think. And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself, if one only knew the right way to change them-- when she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off.

One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a tree. ?Which road do I take?? she asked. ?Where do you want to go?? was his response. ?I don?t know,? Alice answered. ?Then,? said the cat, ?it doesn?t matter.

Rule Forty-two. All persons more than a mile high to leave the court.

Every story has a moral. You just need to be clever enough to find it.

He thought he saw a Rattlesnake that questioned him in Greek: he looked again, and found it was the Middle of Next Week. 'The one thing I regret,' he said, 'Is that it cannot speak!

I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir,' said Alice, 'Because I'm not myself you see.

I have a fairy by my side which says I must not sleep, when once in pain I loudly cried it said You must not weep If, full of mirth, I smile and grin, It says You must not laugh when once I wished to drink some gin it said You must not quaff. When once a meal I wished to taste it said You must not bite When to the wars I went in haste it said You must not fight.What may I do? at length I cried, tired of the painful task. The fairy quietly replied, and said You must not ask. Moral: You mustn't.

I said it in Hebrew?I said it in Dutch? I said it in German and Greek; But I wholly forgot (and it vexes me much) That English is what you speak!

If he smiled much more, the ends of his mouth might meet behind, and then I don't know what would happen to his head! I'm afraid it would come off!

I'm a poor man, your majesty, the Hatter began in a weak voice, and I hadn't but just begun my tea, not more than a week or so, and what with the bread and butter so thin - and the twinkling of the tea-

It is better to be feared than loved.

It's always tea-time.

Author Picture
First Name
Lewis
Last Name
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
Birth Date
1832
Death Date
1898
Bio

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass