Marie Curie, fully Marie Skłodowska-Curie, originally Manya Sklodowska

Marie
Curie, fully Marie Skłodowska-Curie, originally Manya Sklodowska
1867
1934

Polish-born French Physicist, Winner of Two Nobel Prizes including one in Chemistry and one on Radioactivity

Author Quotes

We believe the substance we have extracted from pitch-blende contains a metal not yet observed, related to bismuth by its analytical properties. If the existence of this new metal is confirmed we propose to call it polonium, from the name of the original country of one of us.

We cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individual. Toward this end, each of us must work for his own highest development, accepting at the same time his share of responsibility in the general life of humanity?our particular duty being to aid those to whom we think we can be most useful.

We must act.

We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something.

We must not forget that when radium was discovered no one knew that it would prove useful in hospitals. The work was one of pure science. And this is a proof that scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium a benefit for humanity.

When one studies strongly radioactive substances special precautions must be taken if one wishes to be able to take delicate measurements. The various objects used in a chemical laboratory and those used in a chemical laboratory, and those which serve for experiments in physics, become radioactive in a short time and act upon photographic plates through black paper. Dust, the air of the room, and one's clothes all become radioactive.

Without doubt, these dreamers do not deserve wealth, because they do not desire it. Even so, a well-organized society should assure to such workers the efficient means of accomplishing their task, in a life freed from material care and freely consecrated.

The radiation of thorium has an intensity of the same order as that of uranium, and is, as in the case of uranium, an atomic property of the element.

The various reasons we have just enumerated lead us to believe that the new radioactive substance contains a new element to which we propose to give the name of RADIUM.

The way of progress is neither swift nor easy.

There are sadistic scientists who hurry to hunt down errors instead of establishing the truth.

This means that we have here an entirely separate kind of chemistry for which the current tool we use is the electrometer, not the balance, and which we might well call the chemistry of the imponderable.

I never see what has been done; I only see what remains to be done.

I shall devote only a few lines to the expression of my belief in the importance of science ? it is by this daily striving after knowledge that man has raised himself to the unique position he occupies on earth, and that his power and well-being have continually increased.

I walked beside the evening sea And dreamed a dream that could not be; The waves that plunged along the shore Said only: "Dreamer, dream no more!"

A scientist in his laboratory is not a mere technician: he is also a child confronting natural phenomena that impress him as though they were fairy tales.

I was taught that the way of progress I neither swift nor easy.

After all, science is essentially international, and it is only through lack of the historical sense that national qualities have been attributed to it.

In science we must be interested in things, not in persons.

All my life through, the new sights of nature made me rejoice like a child.

It is my earnest desire that some of you should carry on this scientific work and keep for your ambition the determination to make a permanent contribution to science.

At the outbreak of World War I, on the need to train people to use X-rays to examine injuries.

It was like a new world opened to me, the world of science, which I was at last permitted to know in all liberty.

Certain bodies... become luminous when heated. Their luminosity disappears after some time, but the capacity of becoming luminous afresh through heat is restored to them by the action of a spark, and also by the action of radium.

It was necessary at this point to find a new term to define this new property of matter manifested by the elements of uranium and thorium. I proposed the word radioactivity which has since become generally adopted; the radioactive elements have been called radio elements.

Author Picture
First Name
Marie
Last Name
Curie, fully Marie Skłodowska-Curie, originally Manya Sklodowska
Birth Date
1867
Death Date
1934
Bio

Polish-born French Physicist, Winner of Two Nobel Prizes including one in Chemistry and one on Radioactivity