Marquis de Sade, born Donatien Alphonse François de Sade

Marquis de Sade, born Donatien Alphonse
François de Sade
1740
1814

French Aristocrat, Revolutionary Politician, Philosopher and Writer famous for his Libertine Sexuality and Lifestyle

Author Quotes

Our four libertines, half-drunk but nonetheless resolved to abide their laws, contended themselves with kisses, fingerings, but their libertine intelligence knew how to season these mild activities with all the refinements of debauch and lubricity.

The man who alters his way of thinking to suit others is a fool.

To kill a man in a paroxysm of passion is understandable, but to have him killed by someone else after calm and serious meditation and on the pretext of duty honorably discharged is incomprehensible.

Your service will be arduous, it will be painful and rigorous, and the slightest delinquencies will be requited immediately with corporal and afflicting punishments; hence, I must recommend to you prompt exactness, submissiveness, and total self-abnegation that you be enabled to heed naught but our desires; let them be your laws, fly to do their bidding, anticipate them, cause them to be born...

Sensual excess drives out pity in man.

The mechanism that directs government cannot be virtuous, because it is impossible to thwart every crime, to protect oneself from every criminal without being criminal too; that which directs corrupt mankind must be corrupt itself; and it will never be by means of virtue, virtue being inert and passive, that you will maintain control over vice, which is ever active: the governor must be more energetic than the governed.

True happiness lies in the senses, and virtue gratifies none of them.

Sex is as important as eating or drinking and we ought to allow the one appetite to be satisfied with as little restraint or false modesty as the other.

The more defects a man may have, the older he is, the less lovable, the more resounding his success.

Truth titillates the imagination far less than fiction.

Sex without pain is like food without taste

The only way to a woman's heart is along the path of torment.

Variety, multiplicity are the two most powerful vehicles of lust.

Sexual pleasure is, I agree, a passion to which all others are subordinate but in which they all unite.

The pleasure of the senses is always regulated in accordance with the imagination. Man can aspire to felicity only by serving all the whims of his imagination.

We are no guiltier in following the primitive impulses that govern us than is the Nile for her floods or the sea for her waves.

She had already allowed her delectable lover to pluck that flower which, so different from the rose to which it is nevertheless sometimes compared, has not the same faculty of being reborn each spring.

The reasoning man who rejects the superstitions of simpletons necessarily becomes their enemy; he must expect as much and be prepared to laugh at the consequences.

Were he supreme, were he mighty, were he just, were he good, this God you tell me about, would it be through enigmas and buffooneries he would wish to teach me to serve and know him?

The completest submissiveness is your lot, and that is all.

The reasoning man who scorns the prejudices of simpletons necessarily becomes the enemy of simpletons; he must expect as much, and laugh at the inevitable.

What does one want when one is engaged in the sexual act That everything around you give you its utter attention, think only of you, care only for you...every man wants to be a tyrant when he fornicates.

The degradation which characterizes the state into which you plunge him by punishing him pleases, amuses, and delights him. Deep down he enjoys having gone so far as to deserve being treated in such a way.

The ultimate triumph of philosophy would be to cast light upon the mysterious ways in which Providence moves to achieve the designs it has for man.

What I should like to find is a crime the effects of which would be perpetual, even when I myself do not act, so that there would not be a single moment of my life even when I were asleep, when I was not the cause of some chaos, a chaos of such proportions that it would provoke a general corruption or a disturbance so formal that even after my death its effects would still be felt.

Author Picture
First Name
Marquis de Sade, born Donatien Alphonse
Last Name
François de Sade
Birth Date
1740
Death Date
1814
Bio

French Aristocrat, Revolutionary Politician, Philosopher and Writer famous for his Libertine Sexuality and Lifestyle