Marshall McLuhan, fully Herbert Marshall McLuhan

Marshall
McLuhan, fully Herbert Marshall McLuhan
1911
1980

Canadian Philosopher of Communication Theory, Educator, Author and Media Expert

Author Quotes

What we call art would seem to be specialist artifacts for enhancing human perception.

The user is the content of any situation, whether its driving a car, or wearing clothes or watching a show. The user is content.

There is no connection between the elements in an electric world, which is equivalent to being surrounded by the human unconscious.

TV is not good at covering single events. It needs a ritual, a rhythm, and a pattern...[TV] tends to fosters patterns rather than events.

We are no more prepared to encounter radio and TV in our literate milieu than the native of Ghana is able to cope with the literacy that takes him out of his collective tribal world and beaches him in individual isolation.

When Coleridge said that all men are born either Platonists or Aristotelians, he was saying that all men tend to be either acoustic or visual in their sensory bias.

The spoken word was the first technology by which man was able to let go of his environment in order to grasp it in a new way.

The user of the electric light -- or a hammer, or a language, or a book -- is the content. As such, there is a total metamorphosis of the user by the interface. It is the metamorphosis that I consider the message.

There is no individualism in Eastern or oral cultures.

Typographic man can express but is helpless to read the configurations of print technology.

We are not Argus-eyed, but Argus-eared.

When new technologies impose themselves on societies long habituated to older technologies, anxieties of all kinds result.

The stock market was created by the telegraph and the telephone, and its panics are engineered by carefully orchestrated stories in the press.

The victory over Euclidean space was not achieved by isolated individuals, but by a field of young rebels opposed to all absolutes.

There is nothing willful or arbitrary about the Innis mode of expression. Were it to be translated into perspective prose, it would not only require huge space, but the insight into the modes of interplay among forms of organization would also be lost. Innis sacrificed point of view and prestige to his sense of the urgent need for insight. A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight and understanding. As Innis got more insight he abandoned any mere point of view in his presentation of knowledge. When he interrelates the development of the steam press with 'the consolidation of the vernaculars' and the rise of nationalism and revolution he is not reporting anybody's point of view, least of all his own. He is setting up a mosaic configuration or galaxy for insight ? Innis makes no effort to "spell out" the interrelations between the components in his galaxy. He offers no consumer packages in his later work, but only do-it-yourself kits...

Typography as the first mechanization of a handicraft is itself the perfect instance not of a new knowledge, but of applied knowledge.

We are numb in our new electric world as the native involved in our literate and mechanical culture.

When producers want to know what the public wants, they graph it as curves. When they want to tell the public what to get, they say it in curves.

The student of media soon comes to expect the New Media of any period whatever to be classed as 'pseudo' by those who acquired the patterns of earlier media, whatever they may happen to be.

The visual power of the phonetic alphabet is the translate other languages into itself is part of its power to invade right hemisphere (oral) cultures.

Those who make a distinction between education and entertainment don't know the first thing about either.

Typography cracked the voices of silence.

We are swiftly moving at present from an era where business was our culture into an era when culture will be our business. Between these poles stand the huge and ambiguous entertainment industries.

When technology extends one of our senses, a new translation of culture occurs as swiftly as the new technology is interiorized.

The successor to politics will be propaganda. Propaganda, not in the sense of a message or ideology, but as the impact of the whole technology of the times.

Author Picture
First Name
Marshall
Last Name
McLuhan, fully Herbert Marshall McLuhan
Birth Date
1911
Death Date
1980
Bio

Canadian Philosopher of Communication Theory, Educator, Author and Media Expert