Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton

Maurice Harold
Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton
1894
1957

Prime Minister of Great Britian

Author Quotes

It is always a matter of regret from the personal point of view when divergences arise between colleagues, but it is the team that matters and not the individual, and I am quite happy about the strength and the power of the team, and so I thought the best thing to do was to settle up these little local difficulties, and then turn to the wider vision of the Commonwealth.

We do not intend to part from the Americans and we do not intend to be satellites. I am sure they do not want us to be so. The stronger we are, the better partners we shall be; and I feel certain that as the months pass we shall draw continually closer together with mutual confidence and respect.

It is the duty of Her Majesty's Government neither to flap nor to falter.

When I ventured to criticize, the other day, this system I was, I am afraid, misunderstood. As a Conservative, I am naturally in favor of returning into private ownership and private management all those means of production and distribution which are now controlled by state capitalism. I am sure they will be more efficient. What I ventured to question was the using of these huge sums as if they were income. I know now, I have learnt now from the letters that I have received, that I am quite out of date. Modern economists have decided there is no difference between capital and income. I am not so sure. In my younger days, I and perhaps others of your Lordships had friends, good friends, very good fellows indeed too, who failed to make this distinction. For a few years everything went on very well, and then at last the crash came, and they were forced to retire out to some dingy lodging-house in Boulogne, or if the estate were larger and the trustees more generous, to a decent accommodation at Baden-Baden.

It was a storm in a tea cup, but in politics we sail in paper boats.

When the curtain falls, the best thing an actor can do is to go away.

It's a good thing to be laughed at. It's better than to be ignored.

You will find the Americans much as the Greeks found the Romans: great, big, vulgar, bustling people more vigorous than we are and also more idle, with more unspoiled virtues but also more corrupt.

Jaw-jaw is better than war-war.

Let?s be frank about it; most of our people have never had it so good.

Marxism is like a classical building that followed the Renaissance; beautiful in its way, but incapable of growth.

No man should ever lose sleep over public affairs.

Once the bear's hug has got you, it is apt to be for keeps.

So there you are ? you can see what it is like. The camera's hot, probing eye, these monstrous machines and their attendants ? a kind of twentieth century torture chamber, that's what it is. But I must try to forget about that, and imagine that you are sitting here in the room with me.

So what did they do? They solemnly asked Parliament, not to approve or disapprove, but to 'take note' of our decision. Perhaps some of the older ones among you will remember that popular song: 'She didn't say "Yes", she didn't say "No". She didn't say "stay", she didn't say "go". She wanted to climb, but dreaded to fall, she bided her time and clung to the wall.'

The most striking of all the impressions I have formed since I left London a month ago is of the strength of this African national consciousness. In different places it may take different forms but it is happening everywhere. The wind of change is blowing through this continent. Whether we like it or not, this growth of national consciousness is a political fact. We must all accept it as a fact.

The sale of assets is common with individuals and states when they run into financial difficulties. First, all the Georgian silver goes, and then all that nice furniture that used to be in the saloon. Then the Canalettos go.

The wind of change is blowing through the continent [Africa].

It breaks my heart to see (I can't interfere or do anything at my age) what is happening in our country today - this terrible strike of the best men in the world, who beat the Kaiser's army and beat Hitler's army, and never gave in. Pointless, endless. We can't afford that kind of thing. And then this growing division which the noble Lord who has just spoken mentioned, of a comparatively prosperous south, and an ailing north and midlands. That can't go on.

The wind of change is blowing through the continent. Whether we like it or not, this growth of national consciousness is a political fact.

It has been said that there is no fool like an old fool, except a young fool. But the young fool has first to grow up to be an old fool to realize what a damn fool he was when he was a young fool.

Up to 1931 there was no reason to suppose that social changes would not, or could not, follow the same evolutionary pattern which had resulted from the increased creation and distribution of wealth during the nineteenth century. Now, after 1931, many of us felt that the disease was more deep-rooted. It had become evident that the structure of capitalist society in its old form had broken down, not only in Britain but all over Europe and even in the United States. The whole system had to be reassessed. Perhaps it could not survive at all; it certainly could not survive without radical change. Something like a revolutionary situation had developed, not only at home but overseas.

A Foreign Secretary ? and this applies also to a prospective Foreign Secretary ? is always faced with this cruel dilemma. Nothing he can say can do very much good, and almost anything he may say may do a great deal of harm. Anything he says that is not obvious is dangerous; whatever is not trite is risky. He is forever poised between the clich‚ and the indiscretion.

A good wife makes a good husband

A man who trusts nobody is apt to be the kind of man nobody trusts.

Author Picture
First Name
Maurice Harold
Last Name
Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton
Birth Date
1894
Death Date
1957
Bio

Prime Minister of Great Britian