Michael Korda

Michael
Korda
1933

English Writer and Novelist, Editor-in-Chief of Simon & Schuster in New York City

Author Quotes

The purely agitation attitude is not good enough for a detailed consideration of a subject.

The fastest way to succeed is to look as if you're playing by other people's rules, while quietly playing by your own.

The first step to success is to accept the consequences of knowing that you're right, when that is the case. It is not so much a matter of being assertive, as of giving up the comfortable cocoon of apologies and guilt in which most of us have chosen to live.

In order to succeed, we must first believe that we can.

It must be nice, Queenie thought, to be one thing or another, to know where you belonged.

It's not a field, I think, for people who need to have success every day: if you can't live with a nightly sort of disaster, you should get out. I wouldn't describe myself as lacking in confidence, but I would just say that the ghosts you chase you never catch.

It's O.K. to be ambitious. It's O.K. to look out for Number One? It's O.K. to be a winner. And it's always O.K. to be rich.

Learn to accept your mistakes. Don't be a perfectionist about everything.

Learn to use time, think of it as a friend, not an enemy. Don't waste it in going after things you don't want.

Men naturally resent it when women take greater liberties in dress than men are allowed.

Remember: never walk away from failure. On the contrary, study it carefully ? and imaginatively ? for its hidden assets.

Success is the next best thing to happiness, and if you can't be happy as a success, it's very unlikely that you would find a deeper, truer happiness in failure.

The American system demands success, and in order to succeed we must first believe that we can. Yet our society, with its intolerance of failure and poverty, traps millions of people in positions where any kind of success seems impossible to contemplate, and in which failure itself is a kind of passive rebellion against their own misery and the social system which created it in the first place. To succeed it is necessary to accept the world as it is and rise above it.

The biggest fool in the world is he who merely does his work supremely well, without attending to appearance.

Act impeccably! Perform every act as if it were the only thing in the world that mattered.

Ask a book publisher how many copies a book has sold, and he or she, presuming you?re not the author, will probably try to remember the size of the first printing, then double it. If you?re the author, the publisher will try to remember the number of copies that were shipped and cut that in half in order to avoid encouraging you to expect a big royalty check.

By concentrating our efforts upon a few major goals, our efficiency soars, our projects are completed, we are going somewhere.

Escapism sold books, to be sure, but not nearly as many as were sold by exposing America?s flaws and making the average American reader (and book club member) look closely at his or her most cherished social assumptions. Americans might not be eager to accept integration, feminism, homosexuality, juvenile delinquency, and the drug culture? or to shoulder the blame for the existence of these problems? but they were certainly willing to read about them.

In America, success has always been easy to measure. It is the distance between one's origins and one's final achievement that matters.

A word of caution: people will tell you that success can't buy you happiness. This is true enough, but success is the next best thing to happiness, and if you can't be happy as a success, it's very unlikely that you would find a deeper, truer happiness in failure.

The more you can dream, the more you can do.

Art teaches nothing, except the significance of life.

An ounce of hypocrisy is worth a pound of ambition.

To succeed, we must first believe that we can.

The freedom to fail is vital if you're going to succeed, most successful men fail time and time again, and it is a measure of their strength that failure merely propels them into some new attempt at success.

Author Picture
First Name
Michael
Last Name
Korda
Birth Date
1933
Bio

English Writer and Novelist, Editor-in-Chief of Simon & Schuster in New York City