Michel de Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

Michel de
Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne
1533
1592

French Renaissance Writer, Moralist, Essayist, Father of Modern Skepticism

Author Quotes

There is no course of life so weak and sottish as that which is managed by order, method, and discipline.

The value of life lies not in the length of days but in the use you make of them; they have lived for a long time who has little lived. Whether you have lived enough depends not on the number of your years but on your will.

The study of books is a languishing and feeble activity that gives no heat, whereas discussion teaches and exercises us at the same time.

The strangest, most generous, and proudest of all virtues is true courage.

The soul which has no fixed purpose in life is lost; to be everywhere is nowhere.

The secret of success in life is known only to those who have not succeeded.

The plague of man is boasting of his knowledge.

The only thing certain is nothing is certain.

The memory represents to us not what we choose, but what it pleases.

The greatest sign of success for a teacher is to be able to say,

The entire lower world was created in the likeness of the higher world. All that exists in the higher world appears like an image in this lower world; yet all this is but One.

The clatter of arms drowns the voice of law

The children are now working as if I did not exist.

Skepticism is more easily understood by asking "What do I know?"

Since I would rather make of him an able man than a learned man, I would also urge that care be taken to choose a guide with a well-made rather than a well-filled head.

Simple minds, less curious, less well instructed, are made good Christians, and through reverence and obedience hold their simple belief and abide by their laws.

Saying is one thing and doing is another.

Rejoice in the things that are present; all else is beyond thee.

Reason effaces other griefs and sorrows, but engenders those of repentance.

Our religion is made to eradicate vices, instead it encourages them, covers them, and nurtures them.

Once conform, once do what others do because they do it, and a kind of lethargy steals over all the finer senses of the soul.

Of all our infirmities, the most savage is to despise our being.

Of all human and long-existent beliefs concerning religion, that one seems to me to be most probable and most justifiable which recognizes God as a power incomprehensible, source and preserver of all things; all goodness, all perfection, receiving and accepting in good part the honor and reverence which human beings render him under whatever form, under whatever name, and in whatever manner it may be.

Obsession is the wellspring of genius and madness.

Nothing prints more lively in our minds than something we wish to forget.

Author Picture
First Name
Michel de
Last Name
Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne
Birth Date
1533
Death Date
1592
Bio

French Renaissance Writer, Moralist, Essayist, Father of Modern Skepticism