Michel de Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

Michel de
Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne
1533
1592

French Renaissance Writer, Moralist, Essayist, Father of Modern Skepticism

Author Quotes

Being is something we hold dear, and being consists in movement and action. Wherefore each man in some sort exists in his work.

Poverty of goods is easily cured; poverty of mind is irreparable.

We do not aim to correct the man we hang; we correct and warn others by him.

We easily enough confess in others an advantage of courage, strength, experience, activity, and beauty; but an advantage in judgment we yield to none.

We need very strong ears to hear ourselves judged frankly, and because there are few who can endure frank criticism without being stung by it, those who venture to criticizes us perform a remarkable act of friendship, for to undertake to wound or offend a man for his own good is to have a healthy love for him.

What more wretched than the man who is the slave of his own imaginings?

When I want to judge someone, I ask him how satisfied he is with himself, to what extent he is pleased with his words or his work.

Many persons, after they become learned cease to be good; all other knowledge is hurtful to him who has not the science of honesty and good nature.

The most manifest sign of wisdom is a continual cheerfulness; her state is like that of things in the regions above the moon, always clear and serene.

The worth and value of a man is in his heart and his will; there lies his real honor. Valor is the strength, not of legs and arms, but of heart and soul.

We are never [present with] at home, we are always beyond [ourselves]. Fear, desire, hope, project us toward the future and steal from us the feeling and consideration of what is, to busy us with what will be, even when we shall no longer be.

Men are tormented by the opinions they have of things, and not the things themselves.

The most universal quality is diversity.

There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.

We can never be despised as much as we deserve. Pity and commiseration are mingled with some esteem for the thing we pity; the things we laugh at we consider worthless. I do not think there is as much unhappiness in us as vanity, nor as much malice as stupidity. We are not so full of evil as of inanity; we are not as wretched as we are worthless.

No man profits but by the loss of others.

The oldest and best known evil is always more tolerable than a new and unexperienced one.

There is as much difference between us and ourselves as between us and others.

We carry our fetters with us.

No wind favors him who [addresses his voyage to no certain port] has no destined port.

The poverty of goods is easily cured; the poverty of the soul is irreparable.

There is no desire more natural than the desire for knowledge. We try all the ways that can lead us to it. When reason fails us, we use experience.. which is a weaker and less dignified means. But truth is so great a thing that we must not disdain any medium that will lead us to it.

I have never seen a greater monster or miracle in the world than myself.

Nothing is so firmly believed as that which [we least know]a man knoweth least.

The premeditation of death is the premeditation of liberty; he who has learnt to die has forgot to serve.

Author Picture
First Name
Michel de
Last Name
Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne
Birth Date
1533
Death Date
1592
Bio

French Renaissance Writer, Moralist, Essayist, Father of Modern Skepticism