Michelangelo, aka Michaelangelo Buonarroti, fully Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni

Michelangelo, aka Michaelangelo Buonarroti, fully Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni
1475
1564

Italian Renaissance Painter, Sculptor, Architect, Poet and Engineer

Author Quotes

If people knew how hard I had to work to gain my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all.

Lord, grant me that I may always desire more than I can accomplish.

What spirit is so empty and blind, that it cannot recognize the fact that the foot is more noble than the shoe, and skin more beautiful that the garment with which it is clothed?

[His motto:] I am still learning.

Criticize by creating.

Every beauty which is seen here below by persons of perception resembles more than anything else that celestial source from which we all come?.

Good art is nothing but a replica of the perfection of God and a reflection of His art.

He who does not master the nude, cannot understand the principles of architecture.

I followed my heart and figured that if I tried and failed, at least I?d know that I tried.

If it be true that any beautiful thing raises the pure and just desire of man from earth to God, the eternal fount of all, such I believe my love.

It grieves me greatly that I cannot recapture my past... I can only offer you my future, which is short, for I am too old.

Every beauty which is seen here by persons of perception resembles more than anything else that celestial source from which we all are come.

O night, O sweetest time, though black of hue,
with peace you force all the restless work to end;
those who exalt you see and understand,
and he is sound of mind who honours you.
You cut the thread of tired thoughts, for so
you offer calm in your moist shade; you send
to this low sphere the dreams where we ascend
up to the highest, where I long to go.
Shadow of death that brings to quiet close
all miseries that plague the heart and soul,
for those in pain the last and best of cures;
you heal the flesh of its infirmities,
dry and our tears and shut away our toil,
and free the good from wrath and fretting cares.

But if it so happens ... a work ... under pain of otherwise becoming shameful or false, requires fantasy ... [and that] certain limbs or elements of a figure are altered by borrowing from other species, for example transforming into a dolphin the hinder end of a griffon or a stag ... these alterations will be excellent and the substitution, however unreal it may seem, deserves to be declared a fine invention in the genre of the monstrous. When a painter introduces into this kind of work of art chimerae and other imaginary beings in order to divert and entertain the senses and also to captivate the eyes of mortals who long to see unclassified and impossible things, he shows himself more respectful of reason than if he produced the usual figures of men or of animals.

So now, from this mad passion
Which made me take art for an idol and a king
I have learnt the burden of error that it bore
And what misfortune springs from man's desire...
The world's frivolities have robbed me of the time
That I was given for reflecting upon God.

Read the heart and not the letter for the pen cannot draw near the good intent.

With few words I shall make thee understand my soul.

Lord, make me see thy glory in every place.

The greatest artist does not have any concept
Which a single piece of marble does not itself contain
Within its excess, though only
A hand that obeys the intellect can discover it.

What do you despise? By this you are truly known.

There is no greater harm than that of time wasted.

Faith in oneself is the best and safest course.

The mind, the soul, becomes ennobled by the endeavour to create something perfect, for God is perfection, and whoever strives after perfection is striving for something divine.

And who is so barbarous as not to understand that the foot of a man is nobler than his shoe, and his skin nobler than that of the sheep with which he is clothed.

Painters are not in any way unsociable through pride, but either because they find few pursuits equal to painting, or in order not to corrupt themselves with the useless conversation of idle people, and debase the intellect from the lofty imaginations in which they are always absorbed.

Author Picture
First Name
Michelangelo, aka Michaelangelo Buonarroti, fully Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni
Birth Date
1475
Death Date
1564
Bio

Italian Renaissance Painter, Sculptor, Architect, Poet and Engineer