Michelle Obama, fully Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama

Michelle
Obama, fully Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama
1964

American Lawyer and Writer, Wife of the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama

Author Quotes

I've seen firsthand that being president doesn't change who you are. It reveals who you are.

One of the lessons that I grew up with was to always stay true to yourself and never let what somebody else says distract you from your goals. And so when I hear about negative and false attacks, I really don't invest any energy in them, because I know who I am.

The problem is when that fun stuff becomes the habit. And I think that's what's happened in our culture. Fast food has become the everyday meal.

We learned about honesty and integrity - that the truth matters... that you don't take shortcuts or play by your own set of rules... and success doesn't count unless you earn it fair and square.

You can't make decisions based on fear and the possibility of what might happen. We just weren't raised that way.

At the end of the day, when it comes time to make that decision, as president, all you have to guide you are your values, and your vision, and the life experiences that make you who you are.

Good relationships feel good. They feel right. They don't hurt.

I love that for Barack, there is no such thing as 'us' and 'them' - he doesn't care whether you're a Democrat, a Republican, or none of the above... he knows that we all love our country... and he's always ready to listen to good ideas... he's always looking for the very best in everyone he meets.

I've seen how the issues that come across a president's desk are always the hard ones - the problems where no amount of data or numbers will get you to the right answer.

One of the lessons that I grew up with was to always stay true to yourself and never let what somebody else says distract you from your goals.

The realities are that, you know, as a black man, you know, Barack can get shot going to the gas station, you know.

We need big change. not just the shifting of power among insiders. We need to change the game, because the game is broken.

You know, it's been a whirlwind. When you think about what he's been able to put together in less than a year, I mean, we went from the beginning of this thing where there was an inevitable candidate. As far as the polls and the pundits were concerned, this race was over. And then you sort of start building an organization and raising money and meeting people and having conversations.

Barack and I have been in the public eye for many years now, and we've developed a thick skin along the way. When you?re out campaigning, there will always be criticism. I just take it in stride, and at the end of the day, I know that it comes with the territory.

He invited me to go to one of the churches because he had been a community organizer and worked on the far South Side with a group of churches. And he took me to a training that he was doing. And there were mostly single parent mothers, mostly African Americans on the South Side.

I love that we can trust Barack to do what he says he's going to do, even when it's hard - especially when it's hard.

just do what works for you, because there will always be someone who think differently.

One of the things, the important aspects of this race, is role modeling what good families should look like. Our view was that, if you can't run your own house, you certainly can't run the White House.

The thing that I want you all to remember: please, please, don?t base your vote, this time, on fear. Base it on possibility.

We need to do a better job of putting ourselves higher on our own 'to do' list.

You may not always have a comfortable life and you will not always be able to solve all of the world's problems at once but don't ever underestimate the importance you can have because history has shown us that courage can be contagious and hope can take on a life of its own.

All of us driven by a simple belief that the world as it is just won't do - that we have an obligation to fight for the world as it should be.

Although the circumstances of our lives may seem very disengaged, with me standing here as the First Lady of the United States of America and you just getting through school, I want you to know we have very much in common. For nothing in my life ever would have predicted that I would be standing here as the first African-American First Lady.

America is just downright mean.

And as more people talk to us about it, I mean the question came up again and again. What people were most concerned about: they were afraid. It was fear. Fear, again, raising its ugly head, in one of the most important decisions we would make. Fear; fear of everything. Fear that we might lose. Fear that he might get hurt. Fear that this would be ugly. Fear that it would hurt our family. Fear.

Author Picture
First Name
Michelle
Last Name
Obama, fully Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama
Birth Date
1964
Bio

American Lawyer and Writer, Wife of the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama