Michio Kaku

Michio
Kaku
1947

American Futurist, Theoretical Physicist, Popularizer of Science, Author, Henry Semat Chair and Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York

Author Quotes

If you take a look at the most fantastic schemes that are considered impossible: teleportation, warp drive, parallel universes, other dimensions, artificial intelligence, ray guns, you realize that they can be possible if we advance technology a little bit.

In other words, the process of observation determines the final state of the electron.

Intelligence seems to be correlated with the complexity with which we can simulate future events,

Last is D, the number of spatial dimensions. Due to interest in M-theory, physicists have returned to the question of whether life is possible in higher or lower dimensions.

My point is, no one can stop the Internet. No one can stop that march. It doesn't mean that it's going to be smooth, though.

One of the most exciting developments in the coming years will be a better understanding of mental illness, which is one of the greatest source of human suffering, going back to the dawn of humanity. Using brain scans of schizophrenics, for example, one can actually see areas of the brain light up that are used when we talk to ourselves. However, in schizophrenics, this happens without their permission or knowledge. They are literally talking to themselves, but are convinced the voices come from external sources, such as aliens. Similarly, one can use brain scans to see precisely where the brain goes awry in bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, etc. A cure is still far away, but this technology allows us to see precisely how the brain is malfunctioning.

Remember the movie 'The Matrix,' where virtual information popped up to help inform physical day-to-day reality? Such things won't always be the stuff of Hollywood. If the Internet is accessible via contact lenses, biographies will appear next to the faces of the people we talk to, and we will see subtitles if they speak a foreign language.

Some advice. Keep the flame of curiosity and wonderment alive, even when studying for boring exams. That is the well from which we scientists draw our nourishment and energy. And also, learn the math. Math is the language of nature, so we have to learn this language.

The back and center part of our brains, containing the brain stem, cerebellum, and basal ganglia, are almost identical to the brains of reptiles. Known as the reptilian brain, these are the oldest structures of the brain, governing basic animal functions such as balance, breathing, digestion, heartbeat, and blood pressure. They also control behaviors such as fighting, hunting, mating, and territoriality, which are necessary for survival and reproduction. The reptilian brain can be traced back about 500 million years.

The modern thinking is that time did not start with the big bang, and that there was a multiverse even before the big bang. In the inflation theory, and in string theory, there were universes before our big bang, and that big bangs are happening all the time. Universes are formed when bubbles collide or fission into smaller bubbles.

The Split-Brain Paradox: One way in which this picture, based on the corporate hierarchy of a company, deviates from the actual structure of the brain can be seen in the curious case of split-brain patients. One unusual feature of the brain is that it has two nearly identical halves, or hemispheres, the left and right. Scientists have long wondered why the brain has this unnecessary redundancy, since the brain can operate even if one entire hemisphere is completely removed. No normal corporate hierarchy has this strange feature. Furthermore, if each hemisphere has consciousness, does this mean that we have two separate centers of consciousness inside one skull?

Author Picture
First Name
Michio
Last Name
Kaku
Birth Date
1947
Bio

American Futurist, Theoretical Physicist, Popularizer of Science, Author, Henry Semat Chair and Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York