Michio Kaku

Michio
Kaku
1947

American Futurist, Theoretical Physicist, Popularizer of Science, Author, Henry Semat Chair and Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York

Author Quotes

When we're born, we want to know why the stars shine. We want to know why the sun rises.

There is an old saying: ?If appearance and essence were the same thing, there would be no need for science.?

Time travel and teleportation will have to wait. It may take centuries to master these technology. But within the coming decades, we will understand dark matter, perhaps test string theory, find planets which can harbor life, and maybe have Brain 2.0, i.e. our consciousness on a disk which will survive even after we die.

We believe that black holes collapse to rings hitting very fast. If you follow through the ring you don't die. The mathematics says you fall straight through, perhaps to another universe.

What was God thinking when the universe was created? That?s where we are going with this thing [the super collider]. ? The universe? is quite beautiful? it could have been random? it could have been horrible? that?s what Einstein believed

When you come up with a theory, you fall in love with the beauty the simplicity and elegance of it. But then you have to get a sheet of paper and pencil and crack out all the details. Hundreds and hundreds of pages. Because you have to prove it.

There is no universal consensus as to whether machines can be conscious, or even a consensus as to what consciousness means. No one has come up with a suitable definition of consciousness.

To a physicist, beauty means symmetry and simplicity. If a theory is beautiful, this means it has a powerful symmetry that can explain a large body of data in the most compact, economical manner.

We can now give you a biological reason why cramming doesn?t work, says Dr. Tully. The best way to prepare for a final exam is to mentally review the material periodically during the day, until the material becomes part of your long-term memory. This may also explain why emotionally charged memories are so vivid and can last for decades. The CREB repressor gene is like a filter, cleaning out useless information. But if a memory is associated with a strong emotion, it can either remove the CREB repressor gene or increase levels of the CREB activator gene.

What we usually consider as impossible are simply engineering problems... there's no law of physics preventing them.

When you look at the calculation, it's amazing that every time you try to prove or disprove time travel, you've pushed Einstein's theory to the very limits where quantum effects must dominate. That's telling us that you really need a theory of everything to resolve this question. And the only candidate is string theory.

There is so much noise on the Internet, with would-be prophets daily haranguing their audience and megalomaniacs trying to push bizarre ideas, that eventually people will cherish a new commodity: wisdom.

To a physicist, we have the 'I' word, the I-word is 'impossible.' That's dangerous.

We can summarize electricity, magnetism and gravity into equations one inch long, and that's the power of field theory. And so I said to myself: I will create a field theory of strings. And when I did it one day, it was incredible, realizing that on a sheet of paper I can write down an equation which summarized almost all physical knowledge.

What would happen if history could be rewritten as casually as erasing a blackboard? Our past would be like the shifting sands at the seashore, constantly blown this way or that by the slightest breeze. History would be constantly changing every time someone spun the dial of a time machine and blundered his or her way into the past. History, as we know it, would be impossible. It would cease to exist.

Will computers eventually surpass us in intelligence? Certainly, there is nothing in the laws of physics to prevent that.

There isn?t an equation that can confirm something as self-evident (to us humans) as muggy weather is uncomfortable or mothers are older than their daughters. There has been some progress made in translating this sort of information into mathematical logic, but to catalog the common sense of a four-year-old child would require hundreds of millions of lines of computer code. As Voltaire once said, Common sense is not so common.

To myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on a seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.

We do spend too much time on the telephone, and you know something? We love it.

When a person tells a lie, he simultaneously has to know the truth, concoct the lie, and rapidly analyze the consistency of this lie with previously known facts.

Will we no longer be the most intelligent being on earth.

There's no reason why we cannot become smarter, more perfect, and maybe even live longer.

To understand the difficulty of predicting the next 100 years, we have to appreciate the difficulty that the people of 1900 had in predicting the world of 2000.

We don?t want the human race to split into different genetic factions, the enhanced and the unenhanced, but society will have to democratically decide how far to push this technology.

When Einstein later complained that God does not play dice with the world, Bohr reportedly fired back, Stop telling God what to do.

Author Picture
First Name
Michio
Last Name
Kaku
Birth Date
1947
Bio

American Futurist, Theoretical Physicist, Popularizer of Science, Author, Henry Semat Chair and Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York