Mother Jones, referring to Mary Harris Jones

Mother
Jones, referring to Mary Harris Jones
1837
1930

American Labor Activist and Community Organizer

Author Quotes

What one state could not get alone, what one miner against a powerful corporation could not achieve, can be achieved by the union.

Whatever your fight, don't be ladylike.

Women need to realize that with what they have in their hands there is no limit to what they could accomplish. The trouble is they let the capitalists make them believe they wouldn't be ladylike.

You know I took an oath to tell the truth when I took the witness stand.

You must stand for free speech in the streets.

Your organization is not a praying institution. It's a fighting institution. It's an educational institution along industrial lines. Pray for the dead and fight like hell for the living!

I hope to live long enough to be the great-grandmother of all agitators.

Men's hearts are cold. They are indifferent. Not all the coal that is dug warms the world. It remains indifferent to the lives of those who risk their life and health down in the blackness of the earth; who crawl through dark, choking crevices with only a bit of lamp on their caps to light their silent way; whose backs are bent with toil, whose very bones ache, whose happiness is sleep, and whose peace is death.

They began work at 5:30 and quit at 7 at night. Children six years old going home to lie on a straw pallet until time to resume work the next morning! I have seen the hair torn out of their heads by the machinery, their scalps torn off, and yet not a single tear was shed, while the poodle dogs were loved and caressed and carried to the seashore.

I know no East or West, North or South, when it comes to my class fighting the battle for justice. If it is my fortune to live to see the industrial chain broken from every workingman's child in America, and if then there is one black child in Africa in bondage, there shall I go.

My teachers treated me as a diamond in the rough, someone who needed smoothing.

Today the white child is sold for two dollars a week to the manufacturers.

I live in the United States but I do not know exactly where. My address is wherever there is a fight against oppression. Sometimes I am in Washington, then in Pennsylvania, Arizona, Texas, Minnesota, Colorado. My address is like my shoes: it travels with me.

No matter what the fight, don?t be ladylike! God almighty made women and the Rockefeller gang of thieves made the ladies.

We are told that every American boy has the chance of being president. I tell you that these little boys in the iron cages would sell their chance any day for good square meals and a chance to play.

I nursed men back to sanity who were driven to despair. I solicited clothes for the ragged children, for the desperate mothers. I laid out the dead, the martyrs of the strike.

Not all the coal that is dug warms the world.

What is a good enough principle for an American citizen ought to be good enough for the working man to follow.

A lady is the last thing on earth I want to be. Capitalists sidetrack the women into clubs and make ladies of them.

I preferred sewing to bossing little children.

Often while sewing for the lords and barons who lived in magnificent houses on the Lake Shore Drive, I would look out of the plate glass windows and see the poor, shivering wretches, jobless and hungry, walking alongside the frozen lake front. The contrast of their condition with that of the tropical comfort of the people for whom I sewed was painful to me.

All the average human being asks is something he can call a home; a family that is fed and warm; and now and then a little happiness; once in a long while an extravagance.

I want to hold a series of meetings all over the country and get the facts before the American people.

Out of labor's struggle in Arizona came better conditions for the workers, who must everywhere, at all times, under advantage and disadvantage work out their own salvation.

God almighty made women and the Rockefeller gang of thieves made the ladies.

Author Picture
First Name
Mother
Last Name
Jones, referring to Mary Harris Jones
Birth Date
1837
Death Date
1930
Bio

American Labor Activist and Community Organizer