Nathaniel Hawthorne

Nathaniel
Hawthorne
1804
1864

American Novelist, Short-Story Writer best known for novels The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables

Author Quotes

Nobody, I think, ought to read poetry, or look at pictures or statues, who cannot find a great deal more in them than the poet and artist has actually expressed.

It is very singular how the fact of a man’s death often seems to give people a truer idea of his character, whether possessed while he was living and acting among them.

Let us acknowledge it wiser, if not more sagacious, to follow out one's daydream to its natural consummation, although if the vision have been worth the having, it is certain never to be consummated otherwise than by a failure.

It is not the statesman, the warrior, or the monarch that survives, but the despised poet, whom they may have fed with their crumbs, and to whom they owe that they are now or have - name

Is it a fact - or have I dreamt it - that by means of electricity the world of matter has become a great nerve, vibrating thousands of miles in a breathless point of time? Rather, the round globe is a vast head, a brain, instinct with intelligence; or shall we say it is itself a thought, nothing but thought, and no longer the substance which we dreamed it.

In truth there is no such thing in man’s nature as a settled and full resolve either for good or evil, except at the very moment of execution.

The greatest obstacle to being heroic is the doubt whether one may not be going to prove one's self a fool; the truest heroism is to resist the doubt; and the profoundest wisdom, to know when it ought to be resisted, and when it be obeyed.

Happiness in this world, when it comes, comes incidentally. Make it the object of pursuit, and it leads us on a wild goose chase, and is never attained. Follow some other object, and very possibly we may find that we caught happiness without dreaming of it.

If we take the freedom to put a friend under our microscope, we thereby insulate him from many of his true relations, magnify his peculiarities, inevitably tear him into parts, and, of course, patch him very clumsily together again. What wonder, then, should we be frightened by the aspect of a monster.

Genius is the ability to act wisely without precedent - power to do the right thing the first time.

Every individual has a place to fill in the world, and is important in some respect, whether he chooses to be so or not.

A stale article, if you dip it in good, warm, sunny smile, will go off better than a fresh one that you have scowled upon.

All brave men love; for he only is brave who has affections to fight for, whether in the daily battle of life or in physical contests.

There is no such thing in man's nature as a settled and full resolve either for good or evil, except at the very moment of execution.

A bodily disease which we look upon as whole and entire within itself, may, after all, be but a symptom of some ailment in the spiritual part.

Insincerity in a man's own heart must make all his enjoyments - all that concerns him, unreal; so that his whole life must seem like a merely dramatic representation.

No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself, and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.

Selfishness is one of the qualities apt to inspire love.

A man's soul may be buried and perish under a dungheap or in a furrow of the field, just as well as under a pile of money.

If conscience smite thee once, it is an admonition; if twice, it is a condemnation... What other dungeon is so dark as one's own heart! What jailer so inexorable as one's self!

Author Picture
First Name
Nathaniel
Last Name
Hawthorne
Birth Date
1804
Death Date
1864
Bio

American Novelist, Short-Story Writer best known for novels The Scarlet Letter and The House of the Seven Gables