Neil Gaiman, fully Neil Richard Gaiman

Neil
Gaiman, fully Neil Richard Gaiman
1960

English Author of Short Fiction, Novels, Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Audio Theatre and Films. Notable works include the comic book series, 'The Sandman' and novels including 'Stardust', 'American Gods', 'Coraline' and 'The Graveyard Book'. Winner of the Newbery Medal and Carnegie Medal in Literature

Author Quotes

The reason why story is so important to us is because it's actually this thing that we have been using since the dawn of humanity to become more than just one person... Stories are ways that we communicateimportant things, but ... stories maybe really aregenuinely symbiotic organisms that we live with, that allow human beings to advance.

Animals in fiction ... are your first attempt to put your head into the "other" and to experience the other, the idea of another...

Tom Sebeok concluded you couldn't actually create a story that would last 10,000 years; you could only create a story that would last for three generations ? for ourselves, for our children, and for their children.

As individuals, we are cut off from humanity; as individuals, we are naked ? we do not even know which plants will kills us. Without the mass of human knowledge accumulated over millennia to buoy us up, we are in big trouble; with it, we are warm, fed, we have popcorn, we are sitting in comfortable seats, and we are capable of arguing with each other about really stupid things on the internet.

We [writers] decry too easily what we do, as being kind of trivial ? the creation of stories as being a trivial thing. But the magic of escapist fiction ... is that it can actually offer you a genuine escape from a bad place and, in the process of escaping, it can furnish you with armor, with knowledge, with weapons, with tools you can take back into your life to help make it better... It's a real escape ? and when you come back, you come back better-armed than when you left.

You're always you, and that don't change, and you're always changing, and there's nothing you can do about it.

You're brave. You are the bravest person I know, and you are my friend. I don't care if you are imaginary.

You're Hell's Angels, then? What chapter are you from?'

You're no help, he told the lime. This was unfair. It was only a lime; there was nothing special about it at all. It was doing the best it could.

You're sick. Sick and evil and weird.

You're weird,' she said. 'You don't have any friends.' 'I didn't come here for friends,' said Bod truthfully. I came here to learn.' Mo's nose twitched. Do you know how weird that is?' she asked. Nobody comes to school to learn. I mean, you come because you have to.

You?ve got to admit it?s a bit of a pantomime, though, said Crawly. I mean, pointing out the Tree and saying ?Don?t Touch? in big letters. Not very subtle, is it? I mean, why not put it on top of a high mountain or a long way off? Makes you wonder what He?s really planning.

You'll think this is a bit silly, but I'm a bit--well, I have a thing about birds. What, a phobia? Sort of. Well, that's the common term for an irrational fear of birds. What do they call a rational fear of birds, then?

Young man, he said, understand this: there are two Londons. There's London Above?that's where you lived?and then there's London Below?the Underside?inhabited by the people who fell through the cracks in the world. Now you're one of them. Good night.

You're a big one... a tall drink of water, but I got to tell you, you don't look too bright. I got a son, stupid as a man who bought his stupid at a two-for-one sale, and you remind me of him.

You're a poem?' I repeated. She chewed her lower lip. 'If you want. I am a poem, or I am a pattern, or a race of people whose whose world was swallowed by the sea.' 'Isn't it hard to be three things at the same time?' 'What's your name?' 'Enn.' 'So you are Enn,' she said. 'And you are a male. And you are a biped. Is it hard to be three things at the same time?

You wouldn't die in here, nothing ever dies in here, but if you stayed here for too long, after a while just a little of you would exist everywhere, all spread out. And that's not a good thing. Never enough of you all together in one place, so there wouldn't be anything left that would think of itself as an 'I.' No point of view any longer, because you'd be an infinite sequence of views and of points...

You wouldn't have to wash, said Brian, whose parents forced him to wash a great deal more than he thought could possibly be healthy. Not that it did any good. There was something basically ground in about Brian.

You, she told him, are so full of shit, it's a wonder your eyes don't turn brown.

You?re as plain as the nose on your face, said Mr. Pennyworth. And your nose is remarkably obvious. As is the rest of your face, young man. As are you. For the sake of all that is holy, empty your mind. Now. You are an empty alleyway. You are a vacant doorway. You are nothing. Eyes will not see you. Minds will not hold you. Where you are is nothing and nobody.

You?re going back? asked Bod. Things that had been immutable were changing. You?re really leaving? But. You?re my guardian.

You?ve a good heart, she told him. Sometimes that?s enough to see you safe wherever you go. Then she shook her head. But mostly, it?s not.

You shone like a star. The funniest, wisest writer and the finest friend.

You should know that if we do fucking kill you, the we'll just delete you. You got that? One click and then you're over-written with random ones and zeros. Undelete is not an option.

You think you know all there is to know about here immediately upon meeting her, but everything you think you know is wrong. Passion flows through her like a river of blood.

Author Picture
First Name
Neil
Last Name
Gaiman, fully Neil Richard Gaiman
Birth Date
1960
Bio

English Author of Short Fiction, Novels, Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Audio Theatre and Films. Notable works include the comic book series, 'The Sandman' and novels including 'Stardust', 'American Gods', 'Coraline' and 'The Graveyard Book'. Winner of the Newbery Medal and Carnegie Medal in Literature