Nicolas Chamfort,fully Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort, also spelled Nicholas

Nicolas
Chamfort,fully Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort, also spelled Nicholas
1741
1794

French Writer known for his Epigrams and Aphorisms

Author Quotes

Speaking of women's favors, M. de ? used to say: It is an auction room business, and neither feeling nor merit are ever successful bidders.

'Tis easier to make certain things legal than to make them legitimate.

Stupidity would not be absolute stupidity did it not fear intelligence.

To help a man suffering from dropsy, it's far better to cure his thirst than to offer him a barrel of wine. Apply this principle to the wealthy.

Swallow a toad in the morning and you will encounter nothing more disgusting the rest of the day.

Vain is equivalent to empty; thus vanity is so miserable a thing, that one cannot give it a worse name than its own. It proclaims itself for what it is.

Paris: a city of pleasures and amusements where four-fifths of the people die of grief.

The best philosophical attitude to adopt towards the world is a union of the sarcasm of gaiety with the indulgence of contempt.

We leave unmolested those who set the fire to the house, and prosecute those who sound the alarm.

Pleasure can be supported by an illusion; but happiness rests upon truth.

The contemplative life is often miserable. One must act more, think less, and not watch oneself live.

We ought to be able to combine opposites: the love of goodness with indifference to other people's opinions, a liking for work with indifference to fame, concern for our health with indifference to life.

Pleasure may come from illusion, but happiness can come only of reality.

The great always sell their society to the vanity of the little.

What I learned I no longer know; the little I still know, I guessed.

Poets, orators, even philosophes, say the same things about fame we were told as boys to encourage us to win prizes. What they tell children to make them prefer being praised to eating jam tarts is the same idea constantly drummed into us to encourage us to sacrifice our real interests in the hope of being praised by our contemporaries or by posterity.

The majority of the books of our time give one the impression of having been manufactured in a day out of books read the day before.

What makes the success of many books consists in the affinity there is between the mediocrity of the author's ideas and those of the public.

Public opinion is the worst of all opinions.

The new friends whom we make after attaining a certain age and by whom we would fain replace those whom we have lost, are to our old friends what glass eyes, false teeth and wooden legs are to real eyes, natrual teeth and legs of flesh and bone.

Whatever evil a man may think of women, there is no woman but thinks more.

Running a house should be left to innkeepers.

The perfect man? is in a well-lit area watching the foolish antics of people stumbling around in the dark. He can demolish with a laugh the false standards and judgments which others apply to people and things.

When a man and a woman have an overwhelming passion for each other, it seems to me, in spite of such obstacles dividing them as parents or husband, that they belong to each other in the name of Nature, and are lovers by Divine right, in spite of human convention or the laws.

Scandal is an importunate wasp, against which we must make no movement unless we are quite sure that we can kill it; otherwise it will return to the attack more furious than ever.

Author Picture
First Name
Nicolas
Last Name
Chamfort,fully Sébastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort, also spelled Nicholas
Birth Date
1741
Death Date
1794
Bio

French Writer known for his Epigrams and Aphorisms