Ovid, formally Publius Ovidius Naso

Ovid, formally Publius Ovidius Naso
43 B.C.
17 A.D.

Roman Poet, Man of Letters

Author Quotes

We two [Deucalion and Pyrrha, after the deluge] form a multitude.

The more high-minded a man is the more easily is his anger appeased.

The swallow is not ensnared by men because of its gentle nature.

There is a certain pleasure in weeping; grief finds in tears both a satisfaction and a cure.

These are the only boats we have to return to our homeland; behold, our only means of escape from Minos. He, who closed all other exits, cannot shut off the air for us; we are left with the air; crack it thanks to my invention. But it is not for virgin Strategy, nor the companion of Bootes, one needs to look, but for Ori?o, armed with a club; for me is that you should direct your march with wings I will give you; I will go ahead to show the way; worry only about following me; guided by me you'll be safe if through the layers of the ether, we get closer to the sun, the wax cannot stand the heat; up, down, agitate the wings very near the sea, our down, beating, will be wetted by sea water. Fly between the two. Also watch the winds, my son; where your breath guide you, immerse yourself in its wings.

Thus, while the mute creation downward bend their sight, and to their earthly mother tend, man looks aloft, and with erected eyes beholds his own hereditary skies.

To be instructed in the arts, softens the manners and makes men gentle.

Venus of Eryx, from her mountain throne, saw Hades and clasped her swift-winged son, and said: 'Cupid, my child, my warrior, my power, take those sure shafts with which you conquer all, and shoot your speedy arrows to the heart of the great god to whom the last lot fell when the three realms were drawn. Your mastery subdues the gods of heaven and even Jove, subdues the ocean's deities and him, even him, who rules the ocean's deities. Why should Hell lag behind? Why not there too?

We two are to ourselves a crowd.

The most wretched fortune is safe; for there is no fear of anything worse.

The time will come when it will disgust you to look in the mirror.

There is a deity within us who breathes that divine fire by which we are animated.

They come to see; they come that they themselves may be seen

Time glides away and as we get older through the noiseless years; the days flee and are restrained by no reign.

To be silent is but a small virtue; but it is a serious fault to reveal secrets.

Very slight violence will break that which has once been cracked.

Well doth he live who lives retired, and keeps his wants within the limit of his means.

The mother endures with greater courage the loss of one out many children, than she who, in her tears, exclaims, Thou wast my only one!

The time will come when you will hate the sight of a mirror.

There is a God within us, and we glow when He stirs us.

This also, that I live, I consider a gift of God.

Time glides by and we grow old with the silent years; and the days flee away with no restraining curb.

To be thoroughly imbued with the liberal arts refines the manners, and makes men to be mild and gentle in their conduct.

We always strive for that which is forbidden, and desire that which is denied us.

Well has he lived who has lived well in obscurity.

Author Picture
First Name
Ovid, formally Publius Ovidius Naso
Birth Date
43 B.C.
Death Date
17 A.D.
Bio

Roman Poet, Man of Letters