Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bonds: Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction, and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be.

Whoever is full of wisdom is naturally compassionate; in fact we recognize that someone has gained spiritual wisdom by seeing their compassionate behavior. . . . Individuals and countries with power need to develop wisdom and compassion, for without these attributes, there is a danger that the power will be used to oppress and exploit others.

With the existence of the root, there will be fruits also: namely, the births of different species of life, their life spans and experiences.

With the perfection of contemplation, one?s conscience immediately attains a state of meditation. Initially, a practitioner faces difficulty in concentrating and achieving meditation but with practice, state of meditation becomes easy to achieve and there is virtually no gap between contemplation and meditation.

With the suppression of even that through the suspension of all modifications of the mind, contemplation without seed is attained.

With this truth bearing light will begin a new life. Old unwanted impressions are discarded and we are protected from the damaging effects of new experiences.

Withdrawal from mental thought patterns is Yoga.

Without this ignorance, no such union occurs. This is the independence of the Seer.

Wrong knowledge is a false conception of a thing whose real form does not correspond to such a mistaken conception.

When the memory is purified and the mind shines forth as the object alone, it is called non-argumentative.

Wrong knowledge is false, illusory, erroneous beliefs or notions.

When the mind is disturbed by improper thoughts constant pondering over the opposites (is the remedy).

Yama consists of non-violence, truthfulness, non-stealing, continence, and non-greed.

When the mind maintains awareness, yet does not mingle with the senses, nor the senses with sense impressions, then self-awareness blossoms.

Yoga is Achieved through persistent practice and non-attachment.

When the root exists, its fruition is birth, life and experience.

Yoga is the cessation of mind.

When the senses withdraw themselves from the objects and imitate, as it were, the nature of the mind-stuff, this is pratyahara.

Yoga is the settling of the mind into silence. When the mind has settled, we are established in our essential nature, which is unbounded Consciousness. Our essential nature is usually overshadowed by the activity of the mind.

When truthfulness is achieved, the words (of the Yogin) acquire the power of making them fruitful.

Yoga practice can make us more and more sensitive to subtler and subtler sensations in the body. Paying attention to and staying with finer and finer sensations within the body is one of the surest ways to steady the wandering mind.

When you are steadfast in your abstention of thoughts of harm directed toward yourself and others, all living creatures will cease to feel fear in your presence.

Whether manifested or unmanifested they are of the nature of the attributes.

The sound of a word, the idea behind the word, and the object the idea signfies are often taken as being one thing and may be mistaken for one another. By self-control over their distinctions, understanding of all languages of all creatures arises.

The uninterrupted practice of the awareness of the Real is the means of dispersion of ignorance (of Avidya).

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation