Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

Then, again, the condition of the mind in which the `object' (in the mind) which subsides is always exactly similar to the `object' which rises (in the next moment) is called Ekagrata-Parinama.

Thereby one may become as tiny as an atom as well as having many other abilities, such as perfection of the body, and non-resistance to duty.

Things assume reality because of the unity maintained within that modification.

To the outward turned mind, the sensory organs are perfections, but are obstacles to realization.

When one is confirmed in non-possessiveness, the knowledge of the why and how of existence is attained.

The sound, the meaning (behind it) and the idea (which is present in the mind at the time) are present together in a confused state. By performing Samyama (on the sound) they are resolved and there arises comprehension of the meaning of sounds uttered by any living being.

The vehicle of actions has its origin in afflictions, and is experienced in visible and invisible births.

Then, in consequence of the removal of all obscuration and impurities, that which can be known (through the mind) is but little in comparison with the infinity of knowledge (obtained in Enlightenment).

Therein is the faculty of supreme wisdom.

This discipline is practised for the purpose of acquiring fixity of mind on the Lord, free from all impurities and agitations, or on One's Own Reality, and for attenuating the afflictions.

To the people who have developed discrimination all is misery on account of the pains resulting from change, anxiety and tendencies, as also on account of the conflicts between the functioning of the Gunas and Vrttis (of the mind).

When one is confirmed in non-violence, hostility ceases in his presence.

The stages of the attributes effecting the experienced world are the specialized and the unspecialized, the differentiated and the undifferentiated.

The very being of the Seen is for his sake (i.e., Prakrti exists only for his sake).

Then, verily, the mind is inclined towards discrimination and gravitating towards Kaivalya.

These (the five vows), not conditioned by class, place, time or occasion and extending to all stages constitute the Great Vow.

This having been (accomplished) Pranayama which is cessation of inspiration and expiration (follows).

Transformation into another state is by the directed flow of creative nature.

When one is firmly established in speaking truth, the fruits of action become subservient to him.

The stages of the Gunas are the particular, the universal, the differentiated and the undifferentiated.

The very existence of the seen is for the sake of the seer.

Thence are produced intuitional hearing, touch, sight, taste and smell.

These (the restraints), however, become a great vow when they become universal, being unrestricted by any consideration of class, place, time or concept of duty.

This is signified by an indifference to the three attributes, due to knowledge of the Indweller.

Truth is the same always. Whoever ponders it will get the same answer. Buddha got it. Patanjali got it. Jesus got it. Mohammed got it. The answer is the same, but the method of working it out may vary this way or that.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation