Peter Diamandis, fully Peter H. Diamandis

Peter
Diamandis, fully Peter H. Diamandis
1961

Greek-American Engineer, Physician and Entrepreneur, Founder and Chairman of X Prize Foundation X Prize Foundation which offers large cash incentive prizes to inventors to solve grand challenges like space flight, low-cost mobile medical diagnostics and oil spill cleanup, Chairman of Singularity University

Author Quotes

I?ve always believed (to paraphrase computer scientist Alan Kay) that the best way to predict the future is to create it yourself, and in my five decades of experience, there is no better way to do just that than with incentive prizes.

In his first book, 1988?s The Age of Intelligent Machines, Kurzweil used his exponential growth charts to make a handful of predictions about the future. Now, certainly inventors and intellectuals are always making predictions, but his turned out to be uncannily accurate: foretelling the demise of the Soviet Union, a computer?s winning the world chess championship, the rise of intelligent, computerized weapons in warfare, autonomous cars, and, perhaps most famously, the World Wide Web.

It can be argued that because of the nonzero nature of information, the healthiest global economy is built upon the exchange of information.

Light is a fabulous example. In England, artificial lighting was twenty thousand times more expensive circa AD 1300 than it is today.

Of course, in the developed world, this may not sound like much, but it?s a game-changer most everywhere else?and not just for the obvious reasons.

Previously, invention was a linear game: create something in your head, build it in the real world, see what works, see what fails, start over on the next iteration. This was time consuming, creatively restricting, and prohibitively expensive. 3-D printing changes all of that, enabling ?rapid prototyping,? so that inventors can literally print dozens of variations on a design with little additional cost and in a fraction of the time previously required for physical prototyping.

So you have to wonder: what does it take to make a real difference? Not much, actually. Daniel Kahneman?s calculation has lately been extended to the rest of the planet. On average, across the globe, the point on the chart where well-being and money diverge is roughly $10,000. That?s how much the average global citizen needs to earn to fulfill his or her basic needs and gain a toehold toward much greater possibility.

The amygdala is always looking for something to fear.

If someone is always to blame, if every time something goes wrong someone has to be punished, people quickly stop taking risks. Without risks, there can't be breakthroughs.

In June 2011 President Obama announced the National Robotics Initiative.

It helps to have an accurate assessment of our exact starting point. If we can strip away our cynicism, what does our world really look like? How much progress has been made and not noticed?

Lindbergh made the flight to win a prize, not as a personal objective. I really saw the power of that prize written out for me in hard numbers: Nine teams spent [a combined] $400,000 to win that $25,000. It occurred to me that what space really needed was a prize to compel folks to build the ships that would take the rest of us there.

On this small planet, our grand challenges are not isolated concerns. Rather, they are stacked up like rows of dominoes.

Prizes add a really important mix to allow breakthroughs, because peer-reviewed research is typically focused on small, incremental advances.

So, in effect, the planet has grown a central nervous system.? This nervous system is the backbone of the Internet oft things.

If the risk is fully aligned with your purpose and mission, then it's worth considering.

In many cases, we know where we want to go but not how to get there. In others, we know how to get there but want to get there faster.

It is definitely an unusual flight trajectory. But it is not a dangerous flight trajectory.

Medicine is going to change ALOT. I can imagine a time in the near future where the patient is saying "NO WAY... I don't want that human doctor doing the surgery, he/she makes mistakes... I only want the robot... it?s done 300,000 perfect surgeries in a row."

Once our primitive survival instincts take over, our newer, pro-social instincts stay sidelined. Compassion, empathy, altruism?even indignation?become nonfactors.

Prizes change the public perception about an issue. The more prize money, the more the issue is seen as important by the public.

Sometimes crazy ideas are just that, crazy. Some are plain bad. Others are ahead of their time, or miss their market, or are financially impractical. Whatever the case, these notions are doomed. But failure is not necessarily the disaster that everyone assumes.

If training and graduation rates don?t change, the United States could be short 150,000 doctors by 2025.

In my role as chairman of the X PRIZE, I had approached well over one hundred corporate chief executive officers regarding sponsorship. Few were able to grasp the importance of this new market...and those who were had great difficulty accepting the risks involved,

It takes ALL kinds to make any business happen. A lot of the most brilliant "tech" people don't have the social skills of a 10 year old... so they need help. The massively connect world we are creating allowing teams to come together. I blog on this thru www.diamandis.com all the time. I think we have alot of ability for people to "team up" and complement their skills.

Author Picture
First Name
Peter
Last Name
Diamandis, fully Peter H. Diamandis
Birth Date
1961
Bio

Greek-American Engineer, Physician and Entrepreneur, Founder and Chairman of X Prize Foundation X Prize Foundation which offers large cash incentive prizes to inventors to solve grand challenges like space flight, low-cost mobile medical diagnostics and oil spill cleanup, Chairman of Singularity University