Petrarch, anglicized from Italian name Francesco Petrarca

Petrarch, anglicized from Italian name Francesco Petrarca
1304
1374

Italian Scholar, Poet and one of the earliest Renaissance Humanists

Author Quotes

Books come at my call and return when I desire them; they are never out of humor and they answer all my questions with readiness. Some present in review before me the events of past ages; others reveal to me the secrets of Nature. These teach me how to live, and those how to die; these dispel my melancholy by their mirth, and amuse me by their sallies of wit. Some there are who prepare my soul to suffer everything, to desire nothing, and to become thoroughly acquainted with itself. In a word, they open the door to all the arts and sciences.

I wish to go beyond the fire that burns me.

The senses reign, and reason now is dead; from one pleasing desire comes another. Virtue, honor, beauty, gracious bearing, sweet words have caught me in her lovely branches in which my heart is tenderly entangled. In thirteen twenty-seven, and precisely at the first hour of the sixth of April I entered the labyrinth, and I see no way out.

For death betimes is comfort, not dismay, and who can rightly die needs no delay.

I would have preferred to have been born in any other time than our own.

The time will come when every change shall cease, this quick revolving wheel shall rest in peace: no summer then shall glow, nor winter freeze; nothing shall be to come, and nothing past, but an eternal now shall ever last. Those spacious regions where our fancies roam, pain?d by the past, expecting ills to come, in some dread moment, by the fates assign?d, shall pass away, nor leave a rack behind; and Time?s revolving wheels shall lose at last the speed that spins the future and the past: and, sovereign of an undisputed throne, awful eternity shall reign alone.

For style beyond the genius never dares.

In my younger days I struggled constantly with an overwhelming but pure love affair - my only one, and I would have struggled with it longer had not premature death, bitter but salutary for me, extinguished the cooling flames. I certainly wish I could say that I have always been entirely free from desires of the flesh, but I would be lying if I did.

The world?s delight is a brief dream.

For virtue only finds eternal fame.

It did not seem to me to be a time to guard myself against Love's blows: so I went on confident, unsuspecting; from that, my troubles started, amongst the public sorrows.

There is no lighter burden, nor more agreeable, than a pen. Other pleasures fail us or wound, us while they charm, but the pen we take up rejoicing and lay down with satisfaction, for it has the power to advantage not only its lord and master, but many others as well, even though they be far away- sometimes, indeed, though they be not born for thousands of years to come. I believe I speak but the strict truth when I claim that as there is none among earthly delights more noble than literature, so there is none so lasting, none gentler, or more faithful; there is none which accompanies its possessor through the vicissitudes of life at so small a cost of effort or anxiety.

Gold, silver, jewels, purple garments, houses built of marble, groomed estates, pious paintings, caparisoned steeds, and other things of this kind offer a mutable and superficial pleasure; books give delight to the very marrow of one's bones. They speak to us, consult with us, and join with us in a living and intense intimacy.

It's great to be among the weeds flower!

Those spacious regions where our fancies roam, pain'd by the past, expecting ills to come, in some dread moment. By the fates assign'd, shall pass away, nor leave a rack behind; and time's revolving wheels shall lose at last speed that spins the future and the past: and, sovereign of an undisputed throne, eternity shall reign alone.

Gold, silver, precious stones, in a purple garment, the marbles of the house, the worship of the field, Pieter table, an ornamental trappings, steed, and others of that kind of pleasure and superficially have they, to your silent: the books I penetrated with, delight me, are talking together, they seek knowledge and living are joined by a certain familiarity to us and shrill. Golds, silver, jewels, purple gown, houses built of marble, groomed estates, Pious paintings, caparisoned steeds, and other things of this offer a mutable and superficial pleasure; very marrow of one's bones books give delight to. They Speak to us, consult with us, and to join with us in the Living and the intense intimacy.

Loving friendship is able to endure everything; it refuses no burden.

Thyself no more deceive, thy youth hath fled.

He loves but lightly who his love can tell.

My flowery and green age was passing away, and I feeling a chill in the fires had been wasting my heart, for I was drawing near the hillside above the grave.

To-day I made the ascent of the highest mountain in this region, which is not improperly called Ventosum. My only motive was the wish to see what so great an elevation had to offer. I have had the expedition in mind for many years; for, as you know, I have lived in this region from infancy, having been cast here by that fate which determines the affairs of men. Consequently the mountain, which is visible from a great distance, was ever before my eyes, and I conceived the plan of some time doing what I have at last accomplished to-day.

Her walk was like no mortal thing, but shaped after an angel's.

My soul has rest, sweet sigh! alone in thee.

Walk forwards in the radiance of the past.

How difficult it is to save the bark of reputation from the rocks of ignorance.

Author Picture
First Name
Petrarch, anglicized from Italian name Francesco Petrarca
Birth Date
1304
Death Date
1374
Bio

Italian Scholar, Poet and one of the earliest Renaissance Humanists