Philip K. Dick, fully Philip Kindred Dick

Philip K.
Dick, fully Philip Kindred Dick
1928
1982

American Science Fiction Novelist, Short Story Writer, Essayist and Philosopher, Eleven popular films based on his works have been produced, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Paycheck, Next, Screamers, The Adjustment Bureau and Impostor

Author Quotes

Imagine being sentient but not alive. Seeing and even knowing, but not alive. Just looking out. Recognizing but not being alive. A person can die and still go on. Sometimes what looks out at you from a person's eyes maybe died back in childhood.

In the center of an irrational universe governed by an irrational Mind stands rational man.

It is amazing that when someone else spouts the nonsense you yourself believe you can readily perceive it as nonsense.

It was on the order of coin or stamp collecting; no rational explanation could ever be given. And high prices were being paid by wealthy collectors.

Just because something bears the aspect of the inevitable one should not, therefore, go along willingly with it.

Machines are becoming more human, so to speak [and] some meaningful comparison exists between human and mechanical behavior. But is it ourselves that we know first and foremost? Rather than learning about ourselves by studying our constructs, perhaps we should make the attempt to comprehend what our constructs are up to by looking into what we ourselves are up to..

Maybe it's you fuckers, Fred said, who're seeing the universe backward, like in a mirror. Maybe I see it right.

My schedule for today lists a six-hour self-accusatory depression.

Now we define what is good science fiction. Conceptual disfigurement (the new idea, in other words) must be genuinely new, or a new variation on an earlier, and must stimulate the intellect of the reader; You have to invade your mind and open to the possibility of something that until then had not imagined. Good science fiction is an appreciative term, not a goal, but I think that there is something objectively as good science fiction.

People have told me that everything about me, every facet of my life, psyche, experiences, dreams and fears are laid out explicitly in my writing, that from the corpus of my work I can be absolutely and precisely inferred. This is true.

Reality is that which when you stop believing in it does not go away.

Sheep are funny, the Whitlock said. Now, you look at how they behave when you throw some grub over the fence to them, such as corn stalks. Why, they'll spot that from a mile away. The Whitlock chuckled. They're smart when it comes to what concerns them. And maybe that helps us see what true smartness is; it isn't having read a lot of big books, or knowing long words...it's being able to spot what's to our advantage. It's got to be useful to be real smartness.

Sometimes one must try anything, it is no disgrace. On the contrary, it is a sign of wisdom.

That man indeed lives in a zone where no multiplicity can distress him and which is nevertheless the most active workshop of universal fulfillment.

The cries of the dead are terrible indeed; you should try not to hear them.

The hell with the newspapers. Nobody reads the letters to the editor column except the nuts. It's enough to get you down.

The odd thing in this world is that an eager-beaver type, with no original ideas, who mimes those in authority above him right to the last twist of necktie and scrape of chin, always gets noticed. Gets selected. Rises.

The SF writer sees not just possibilities but wild possibilities. It's not just 'What if' - it's 'My God; what if' - in frenzy and hysteria. The Martians are always coming.

Then shall it come to pass the saying that is written,? a voice said. ?Death is swallowed up. In victory.? Perhaps only Fred heard it. ?Because,? the voice said, ?as soon as the writing appears backward, then you know which is illusion and which is not. The confusion ends, and death, the last enemy, Substance Death, is swallowed not into the body but up?in victory. Behold, I tell you the sacred secret now: we shall not all sleep in death.?

How'd you like to gaze at a beer can throughout eternity? It might not be so bad. There'd be nothing to fear.

I did not tell Fat this, but technically he had become a Buddha. It did not seem to me like a good idea to let him know. After all, if you are a Buddha you should be able to figure it out for yourself.

I lifted you from the tomb world just now and I will continue to lift you until you lose interest and want to quit. But you will have to stop searching for me because I will never stop searching for you.(Mercer)

I think Dr. Willis McNelly at the California State University at Fullerton put it best when he said that the true protagonist of a sf story or novel is an idea and not a person. If it is *good* sf the idea is new, it is stimulating, and, probably most important of all, it sets off a chain-reaction of ramification-ideas in the mind of the reader; it so-to-speak unlocks the reader?s mind so that the mind, like the author?s, begins to create. Thus sf is creative and it inspires creativity, which mainstream fiction by-and-large does not do. We who read sf (I am speaking as a reader now, not a writer) read it because we love to experience this chain-reaction of ideas being set off in our minds by something we read, something with a new idea in it; hence the very best since fiction ultimately winds up being a collaboration between author and reader, in which both create and enjoy doing it: joy is the essential and final ingredient of science fiction, the joy of discovery of newness.

I?m a strange person. Sometimes I hardly know what I?m going to do or say next. Sometimes I seem a stranger to myself. Sometimes what I do surprises me and I can?t understand why I do it.

In a civil war? every side is wrong. It?s hopeless to try to untangle it. Everyone is a victim.

First Name
Philip K.
Last Name
Dick, fully Philip Kindred Dick
Birth Date
1928
Death Date
1982
Bio

American Science Fiction Novelist, Short Story Writer, Essayist and Philosopher, Eleven popular films based on his works have been produced, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Paycheck, Next, Screamers, The Adjustment Bureau and Impostor