Phillips Brooks

Phillips
Brooks
1835
1893

American Episcopal Bishop of Massachusetts, Author, Lyricist of "O Little Town of Bethlehem"

Author Quotes

No man has become to true greatness who has not felt in some degree that his life belongs to his race, and that what God gives him he gives him for mankind.

O, do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger men. Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers. Pray for powers equal to your tasks.

Pray for and work for fullness of life above everything; full red blood in the body; full honesty and truth in the mind; and the fullness of a grateful love for the Saviour in your heart.

Prayer is not conquering God’s reluctance, but taking hold of god’s willingness.

The best advisers, helpers and friends, always are not those who tell us how to act in special cases, but who give us, out of themselves, the ardent spirit and desire to act right, and leave us then, even through many blunders, to find out what our own form of right action is

The truest help we can render an afflicted man is not to take his burden from him, but to call out his best energy, that he may be able to bear the burden.

There is no life so humble that, if it be true and genuinely human and obedient to God, it may not hope to shed some of His light. There is no life so meager that the greatest and wisest of us can afford to despise it. We cannot know at what moment it may flash forth with the life of God.

A prayer in its simplest definition is merely a wish turned Godward.

To say, "well done" to any bit of good work is to take hold of the powers which have made the effort and strengthen them beyond our knowledge.

Bad will be the day for every man when he becomes absolutely contented with the life that he is living, with the thoughts that he is thinking, with the deeds that he is doing, when there is not forever beating at the doors of his soul some great desire to do something larger, which he knows that he was means and made to do because he is still, in spite of it all, the child of God.

While men believe in the possibilities of children being religious, they are largely failing to make them so, because they are offering them not a child's but a man's religion - men's forms of truth and men's forms of experience.

Charity should begin at home, but should not stay there.

Go and try to save a soul, and you will see how well it is worth saving, how capable it is of the most complete salvation. Not by pondering about it, nor by talking of it, but by saving it, you learn its preciousness.

Heaven does not make holiness, but holiness makes heaven.

Heaven is not to sweep our truths away, but only to turn them till we see their glory, to open them till we see their truth, and to unveil our eyes till for the first time we shall really see them.

A prayer, in its simplest definition, is merely a wish turned heavenward.

Anger is self-immolation.

Character cannot be made except by a steady, long-continued process.

It does not take great men to do great things; it only takes consecrated men.

It is better to inspire the heart with a noble sentiment than to teach the mind a truth of science.

Let us beware of losing our enthusiasms. Let us ever glory in something, and strive to retain our admiration for all that would ennoble, and our interest in all that would enrich and beautify our life.

No man or woman of the humblest sort can really be strong, gentle, pure and good, without the world being the better for it, without somebody being helped an comforted by the very existence of that goodness.

Obedience completes itself in understanding.

Only the soul that with an overwhelming impulse and a perfect trust gives itself up forever to the life of other men, finds the delight and peace which such complete self-surrender has to give.

The man who has begun to live more seriously within begins to live more simply without.

Author Picture
First Name
Phillips
Last Name
Brooks
Birth Date
1835
Death Date
1893
Bio

American Episcopal Bishop of Massachusetts, Author, Lyricist of "O Little Town of Bethlehem"