Plutarch, named Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus after becoming Roman citizen

Plutarch, named Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus after becoming Roman citizen
c. 46
120

Greek Biographer, Essayist, Historian and Middle Platonist

Author Quotes

When one is transported by rage it is best to observe attentively the effects on those who deliver themselves over to the same passion.

Whenever anything is spoken against you that is not true, do not pass by or despise it because it is false; but forthwith examine yourself, and consider what you have said or done that may administer a just occasion of reproof.

Those who are greedy of praise prove that they are poor in merit.

When malice is joined to envy, there is given forth poisonous and feculent matter, as ink from the cuttlefish.

The state of life is most happy where superfluities are not required and necessities are not wanting.

The talkative listen to no one, for they are ever speaking. And the first evil that attends those who know not how to be silent, is, that they hear nothing.

The man who is completely wise and virtuous has no need at all of glory, except so far as it disposes and eases his way to action by the greater trust that it procures him.

The richest soil, if uncultivated, produces the rankest weeds.

Pain, it is true, transmuted, so to say, by its own fiery heat into anger, loses every appearance of depression and feebleness; the angry man makes a show of energy, as the man in a high fever does of natural heat, while, in fact, all this action of soul is but mere diseased palpitation, distention, and inflammation.

Poverty is dishonorable, not in itself, but when it is a proof of laziness, intemperance, luxury, and carelessness; whereas in a person that is temperate, industrious, just and valiant, and who uses all his virtues for the public good, it shows a great and lofty mind.

Nothing is more intractable than man when in felicity, nor anything more docile, when he has been reduced and humbled by fortune.

Our worst enemies are those we carry about with us in our own hearts.

It is worse to be sick in the soul than in body, for those afflicted in body only suffer, but those afflicted in soul both suffer and do ill.

Medicine, to produce health, has to examine disease, and music, to create harmony, must investigate discord; and the supreme arts of temperance, of justice, and of wisdom, as they are acts of judgment and selection, exercised not on good and just and expedient only, but also on wicked, unjust, and inexpedient objects, do not give their commendations to the mere innocence whose boast is its inexperience of evil, and whose utter name is, by their award, simpleness and ignorance of what all men who live aright should know.

It is no flattery to give a friend a due character; for commendation is as much the duty of a friend as reprehension.

It is the admirer of himself, and not the admirer of virtue, that thinks himself superior to others.

It is an observation no less just than common, that there is no stronger test of a man’s real character than power and authority, exciting, as they do, every passion, and discovering every latent vice.

It is perhaps not to be wondered at, since fortune is ever changing her course and time is infinite, that the same incidents should occur many times, spontaneously. For, if the multitude of elements is unlimited, fortune has in the abundance of her material an ample provider of coincidences; and if, on the other hand, there is a limited number of elements from which events are interwoven, the same things must happen many times, being brought to pass by the same agencies.

Evidence of trust begets trust, and love is reciprocated by love.

For him that would attain to true happiness which for the most part is placed in the qualities and disposition of the mind.

Good fortune will elevate even petty minds, and give them the appearance of a certain greatness and stateliness, as from their high place they look down upon the world; but the truly noble and resolved spirit raises itself, and becomes m ore conspicuous in times of disaster and ill fortune.

Distressed valor challenges great respect, even from enemies.

Courage consists not in hazarding without fear, but being resolutely minded in a just cause.

Confidence begets confidence, and love, love.

Courage and wisdom are, indeed, rarities amongst men, but of all that is good, a just man it would seem is the most scarce.

Author Picture
First Name
Plutarch, named Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus after becoming Roman citizen
Birth Date
c. 46
Death Date
120
Bio

Greek Biographer, Essayist, Historian and Middle Platonist