Ramana Maharshi, fully Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi

Ramana
Maharshi, fully Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi
1879
1950

Indian Sage, Spiritual Teacher

Author Quotes

Take refuge in silence. You can be here or there or anywhere. Fixed in silence, established in the inner 'I', you can be as you are. The world will never perturb you if you are well founded upon the tranquility within. Gather your thoughts within. Find out the thought center and discover your Self-equipoise. In storm and turmoil be calm and silent. Watch the events around as a witness. The world is a drama. Be a witness, inturned and introspective.

That bliss of the Self is always with you, and you will find it for yourself, if you would seek it earnestly.

That inner Self, as the primeval Spirit, Eternal, ever effulgent, full and infinite bliss, single, indivisible, whole and living, shines in everyone as the witnessing awareness.

That inner Self, eternal, ever effulgent, full and infinite Bliss, single, indivisible, whole and living, shines in everyone as the witnessing awareness. That self in its splendour, shining in the cavity of the heart. This self is neither born nor dies, neither grows nor decays, nor does it suffer any change. When a pot is broken, the space within it is not. Similarly, when the body dies the Self in it remains eternal.

That pure consciousness which is the reality, and which shines without a break, as I AM when the mind becomes calm, is the supreme bliss.

So long as the feeling 'I am doing' is there, one must experience the result of one's acts, whether they are good or bad. How is it possible to wipe out one act with another? When the feeling that 'I am doing' is lost, nothing affects a man. Unless one realizes the Self, the feeling 'I am doing' will never vanish.

So long as there is individuality, one is the enjoyer and doer. But if it is lost, the divine Will prevails and guides the course of events.

So one must find out how to become happy oneself.

Solitude is in the mind of man. One might be in the thick of the world and maintain serenity of mind. Such a one is in solitude. Another may stay in a forest, but still be unable to control his mind. Such a man cannot be said to be in solitude. Solitude is a function of the mind. A man attached to desires cannot get solitude wherever he may be, whereas a detached man is always in solitude.

Speech is always less powerful than silence.

Self-reform automatically brings about social reform.

Setting apart time for meditation is only for the merest spiritual novices. A man who is advancing will begin to enjoy the deeper beatitude whether he is at work or not. While his hands are in society, he keeps his head cool in solitude.

Should conduct himself always by word, mind and body in such a fashion that it results in help to the society. He should also make his own men understand this.

Silence is a perennial flow of language, interrupted by words. It is like electricity. When there is resistance to its passage, it glows as a lamp or revolves as a fan. But in the wire it remains as pure energy. In the same way, silence is the eternal flow of language.

Silence is also conversation.

Silence is most powerful. Speech is always less powerful than silence.

Silence is never-ending speech. Vocal speech obstructs the other speech of silence. In silence one is in intimate contact with the surroundings.

Since the Self is the reality of all the gods, the meditation on the Self which is oneself is the greatest of all meditations.

Since you are awareness there is no need to attain or cultivate it. All that you have to do is to give up being aware of other things, that is of the not-Self. If one gives up being aware of them then pure awareness alone remains, and that is the Self.

Seek the seeker.

Seek the source of the ego, abide there forever in the source and find yourself in bliss.

Seek the source of the mind, and you find the mind does not exist at all. The mind, turned outwards, results in thoughts and objects. Turned inwards, it becomes itself the Self.

Seeking the source of the ?I? serves as a means of getting rid of all other thoughts. You should not allow any scope for other thoughts such as you mention, but should keep the attention fixed on finding the source of the ?I?- thought by asking, when any other thought arises, to whom it occurs; and if the answer is ?to me?, you then resume the thought: ?What is this ?I? and what is its source?

Self-enquiry is certainly not an empty formula and it is more than the repetition of any mantra. If the enquiry 'Who am I?' were a mere mental questioning, it would not be of much value. The very purpose of self-enquiry is to focus the entire mind at its source. It is not, therefore, a case of one 'I' searching for another 'I'. Much less is self-enquiry an empty formula, for it involves an intense activity of the entire mind to keep it steadily poised in pure Self-awareness.

Self-enquiry is the one infallible means, the only direct one, to realize the unconditioned, absolute being that you really are.

Author Picture
First Name
Ramana
Last Name
Maharshi, fully Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi
Birth Date
1879
Death Date
1950
Bio

Indian Sage, Spiritual Teacher