Robert Burton

Robert
Burton
1577
1640

English Clergyman, Writer and Scholar at Oxford University

Author Quotes

If the world will be gulled, let it be gulled.

If you like not my writing, go read something else.

Idleness is the nurse of naughtiness.

If adversity hath killed his thousands, prosperity hath killed his ten thousands; therefore adversity is to be preferred. The one deceives, the other instructs; the one miserably happy, the other happily miserable.

Idleness is an appendix to nobility.

Idleness is the badge of the gentry, the bane of body and mind, the nurse of naughtiness, the stepmother of discipline, the chief author of all mischief, one of the seven deadly sins, the cushion upon which the devil chiefly reposes, and a great cause not only of melancholy, but of many other diseases; for the mind is naturally active, and, if it is not occupied about some honest business, it rushes into mischief or sinks into melancholy.

I say to thee be thou satisfied. It is recorded of the hares that with a general consent they went to drown themselves out of a feeling of their misery; but when they saw a company of frogs more fearful than they were, they began to take courage and comfort again. Confer thine estate with others.

I would help others out of a fellow-feeling.

I may not here omit those two main plagues, and common dotages of human kind, wine and women, which have infatuated and besotted myriads of people: they go commonly together.

I light my candle from their torches.

I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.

I am not now in fortune's power, He that is down can fall no lower.

I have no wife or children, good or bad, to provide for; a mere spectator of other men's fortunes and adventures, and how they play their parts; which, methinks, are diversely presented unto me, as from, a common theatre or scene.

Hold one another's noses to the grindstone hard.

Homer himself must beg if he want means, and as by report sometimes he did "go from door to door and sing ballads, with a company of boys about him."

Hence it is clear how much more cruel the pen is than the sword.

Him that makes shoes go barefoot himself.

He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.

Health indeed is a precious thing, to recover and preserve which we undergo any misery, drink bitter potions, freely give our goods: restore a man to his health, his purse lies open to thee.

He that comes last is commonly best.

He that will not when he may, When he will he shall have nay.

He loves who advises.

Have not too low thoughts of thyself. The confidence a man hath of his being pleasant in his demeanor is a means whereby he infallibly cometh to be such.

He is born naked, and falls a whining at the first.

He is only fantastical that is not in fashion.

Author Picture
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Burton
Birth Date
1577
Death Date
1640
Bio

English Clergyman, Writer and Scholar at Oxford University