Robert Louis Stevenson, fully Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson

Robert Louis
Stevenson, fully Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
1850
1894

Scottish Novelist, Poet, Essayist and Travel Writer, known books include Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and the Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Author Quotes

What a supper I had of it that night, with all my friends around me; and what a meal it was, with Ben Gunn's salted goat and some delicacies and a bottle of old wine from the HISPANIOLA. Never, I am sure, were people gayer or happier. And there was Silver, sitting back almost out of the firelight, but eating heartily, prompt to spring forward when anything was wanted, even joining quietly in our laughter--the same bland, polite, obsequious seaman of the voyage out.

What am I to call it? Diffidence? The fear of ridicule? Inverted vanity? What matters names, if it has brought me to this? I could never bear to be bustling about nothing; I was ashamed of this toy kingdom from the first; I could not tolerate that people should fancy I believed in a thing so patently absurd! I would do nothing that cannot be done smiling. I have a sense of humor, forsooth! I must know better than my Maker. And it was the same thing in my marriage, he added more hoarsely. I did not believe this girl could care for me; I must not intrude; I must preserve the foppery of my indifference. What an impotent picture!

We had each of us some whimsy in the brain, which we believed more than anything else, and which discolored all experience to its own shade.

We have affairs in different places; and hence railways were invented. Railways separated us infallibly from our friends; and so telegraphs were made that we might communicate speedier at great distances.

We live in an ascending scale when we live happily, one thing leading to another in an endless series.

We must accept life for what it actually is - a challenge to our quality without which we should never know of what stuff we are made, or grow to our full stature.

We now lay in towns, where nobody troubled us with questions; we had floated into civilised life, where people pass without salutation.

We should wipe two words from our vocabulary: gratitude and charity. In real life, help is given out of friendship, or it is not valued; it is received from the hand of friendship, or it is resented.

Wealth I ask not, hope nor love, Nor a friend to know me; All I ask, the heaven above And the road below me.

We got together in a few days a company of the toughest old salts imaginable--not pretty to look at, but fellows, by their faces, of the most indomitable spirit.

Upon one pin-point of the truth.

Vanity dies hard; in some obstinate cases it outlives the man.

Very old and thick the wood.

Want me when I least deserve it, because it will be when you need it

We all know what Parliament is, and we are all ashamed of it.

We are all travelers in the wilderness of this world, and the best that we find is an honest friend. He is a fortunate voyager who finds many.

We consume the carcasses of creatures that have the appetite and passions as our bodies and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear.

We do not go to cowards for tender dealing; there is nothing so cruel as panic; the man who has least fear for his own carcase, has most time to consider others.

To the Hesitating Purchaser: If sailor tales to sailor tunes, storm and adventure, heat and cold, if schooners, islands, and maroons and Buccaneers and buried Gold and all the old romance, retold, exactly in the ancient way, can please, as me they pleased of old, the wiser youngsters of to-day: -So be it, and fall on! If not, if studious youth no longer crave, his ancient appetites forgot, Kingston, or Ballantyne the brave, or Cooper of the wood and wave: So be it, also! And may I and all my pirates share the grave, where these and their creations lie!

Trelawney, said the doctor, contrary to all my notions, I believe you have managed to get two honest men on board with you--that man and John Silver. Silver, if you like, cried the squire, but as for that intolcrable humbug, I declare I think his conduct unmanly, unsailorly, and downright un-English.

Trusty, dusky, vivid, true, With eyes of gold and bramble-dew, Steel-true and blade-straight, The great artificer Made my mate.

Truth in spirit, not truth to the letter, is the true veracity.

Umbrellas, like faces, acquire a certain sympathy with the individual who carries them. May it not be said of the bearers of these inappropriate umbrellas, that they go about the streets 'with a lie in their right hand?' Except in a very few cases of hypocrisy joined to a powerful intellect, men, not by nature, umbrellarians, have tried again and again to become so by art, and yet have failed, have expended their patrimony in the purchase of umbrella after umbrella, and yet have systematically lost them, and have finally, with contrite spirits and shrunken purses, given up their vain struggle, and relied on theft and borrowing for the remainder of their lives.

Under the strain of this continually impending doom and by the sleeplessness to which I now condemned myself, ay, even beyond what I had thought possible to man, I became, in my own person, a creature eaten up and emptied by fever, languidly weak both in body and mind, and solely occupied by one thought: the horror of my other self.

Under the wide and starry sky dig the grave and let me lie: glad did I live and gladly die, and I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me: here he lies where he long'd to be; home is the sailor, home from the sea, and the hunter home from the hill.

Author Picture
First Name
Robert Louis
Last Name
Stevenson, fully Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
Birth Date
1850
Death Date
1894
Bio

Scottish Novelist, Poet, Essayist and Travel Writer, known books include Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and the Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde