Robert Wright

Robert
Wright
1957

American Journalist, Scholar, and Author of best-selling books about science, evolutionary psychology, history, religion, and game theory

Author Quotes

Although this book will cover many of the behavioral sciences - anthropology, psychiatry, sociology, political science, evolutionary psychology is at its center. It is a young and yet not strong discipline, partially fulfilling the promise to create a new science of thinking allows us to now ask the question that it would be useless to ask, and in 1859, after the publication of The Origin, and in 1959 - the theory of natural selection may be useful to ordinary people? For example, can an evolutionary understanding of human nature to help people achieve their goals in life? Whether it can help them to select these targets? Will it distinguish between attainable and unattainable goals? More precisely, if it will help in determining what goals are worthy? That is, is whether the knowledge of how evolution has shaped our basic moral impulses, decide which impulses we have to consider legal?

Altruism, compassion, empathy, love, conscience, a sense of justice - all that binds society, and gives people a reason for the high self-esteem. And all this, as you can now confidently believe, has a solid genetic basis. This is good news. The bad news is that although these qualities in some way, and bless humanity as a whole, but they did not man a good view and not too reliably serve the people to the end. Rather, and now it is clearer than ever, as (more precisely - why?) Moral feelings are used with the hideous flexibility switched on or off depending on personal interest, and how at ease we are often not aware of such change. A new look at people believe their view, has a great set of moral tools, but tragically inclined to use them for other purposes, and are in a pathetic institutional ignorance about these abuses.

Altruism, compassion, empathy, love, conscience, the sense of justice-all of these things, the things that hold society together, the things that allow our species to think so highly of itself, can now confidently be said to have a firm genetic basis. That's the good news. The bad news is that, although these things are in some ways blessings for humanity as a whole, they did not evolve for the good of the species and are not reliably employed to that end. Quite the contrary: it is now clearer than ever how (and precisely why) the moral sentiments are used with brutal flexibility, switched on and off in keeping with self-interest; and how naturally oblivious we often are to this switching. In the new view, human beings are a species splendid in their array of moral equipment, tragic in their propensity to misuse it, and pathetic in their constitutional ignorance of the misuse. The title of this book is not wholly without irony.

An appraisal of the state of things from a scientific standpoint, yields more evidence of divinity than you might expect. Moreover, I?m agnostic on the question of whether there?s even a deistic sort of God. But, you may ask, if I?m agnostic, then how can Coyne quote me saying things like this: ?God was so wise that he set up a world in which the rational pursuit of self-interest leads people to wisdom.??

Being a person's true friend means endorsing the untruths he holds dearest.

Author Picture
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Wright
Birth Date
1957
Bio

American Journalist, Scholar, and Author of best-selling books about science, evolutionary psychology, history, religion, and game theory