Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor
Coleridge
1772
1834

English Poet, Romantic, Literary Critic and Philosopher, a Founder of the Romantic Movement in England

Author Quotes

Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship, yet she sailed softly too: sweetly, sweetly blew the breeze -on me alone it blew.

The bees are stirring - birds are on the wing -

The faults of great authors are generally excellences carried to an excess.

Sympathy constitutes friendship; but in love there is a sort of antipathy, or opposing passion. Each strives to be the other, and both together make up one whole.

The best amusement for our morning meal.

The first duty of a wise advocate is to convince his opponents that he understands their arguments, and sympathizes with their just feelings

Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherent; genius, being the action of reason and imagination, rarely or never.

The best part of human language, properly so called, is derived from reflection on the acts of the mind itself.

The first great requisite is absolute sincerity. Falsehood and disguise are miseries and misery-makers.

So for the mother's sake the child was dear, and dearer was the mother for the child.

Talk of the devil, and his horns appear.

The blue and bright-eyed floweret of the brook, Hope's gentle gem, the sweet Forget-me-not.

The form of truth will bear exposure, as well as that of beauty herself.

So lonely 'twas that God himself Scarce seemed there to be

Taste is the intermediate faculty which connects the active with the passive powers of our nature, the intellect with the senses; and its appointed function is to elevate the images of the latter, while it realizes the ideas of the former.

The book of Job is pure Arab poetry of the highest and most antique cast.

The frost performs its secret ministry, unhelped by any wind.

So twice five miles of fertile ground with walls and towers were girdled round: and there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; and here were forests ancient as the hills, enfolding sunny spots of greenery.

That dances as often as dance it can.

The bride hath paced into the hall, Red as a rose is she.

The game is done! I've won, I've won! Quoth she, and whistles thrice.

So will I build my altar in the fields, And the blue sky my fretted dome shall be, And the sweet fragrance that the wild flower yields Shall be the incense I will yield to thee.

That he, who many a year, with toil of breath.

The constituent forces of life in the human living body are?first, the power of length, or REPRODUCTION; second, the power of surface (that is, length and breadth), or IRRITABILITY; third, the power of depth, or SENSIBILITY.

The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtle, without being at all acute; hence there is so much humor and so little wit in their literature.

Author Picture
First Name
Samuel Taylor
Last Name
Coleridge
Birth Date
1772
Death Date
1834
Bio

English Poet, Romantic, Literary Critic and Philosopher, a Founder of the Romantic Movement in England