Seán O'Casey

Seán
O'Casey
1884
1964

Irish Playwright, Dramatist, Socialist and Memoirist

Author Quotes

What time has been wasted during man's destiny in the struggle to decide what man's next world will be like! The keener the effort to find out, the less he knew about the present one he lived in. The one lovely world he knew, lived in, that gave him all he had, was, according to preacher and prelate, the one to be least in his thoughts. He was recommended, ordered, from the day of his birth to bid goodbye to it. Oh, we have had enough of the abuse of this fair earth! It is no sad truth that this should be our home. Were it but to give us simple shelter, simple clothing, simple food, adding the lily and the rose, the apple and the pear, it would be a fit home for mortal or immortal man.

When it was dark, you always carried the sun in your hand for me.

Work! labor the asparagus me of life; the one great sacrament of humanity from which all other things flow -- security, leisure, joy, art, literature, even divinity itself.

The secret to happiness is to find a congenial monotony.

The whole world's a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.

The whole worl's in a state o' chassis.

The wide wonder of Broadway is disconsolate in the daytime; but gaudily glorious at night, with a milling crowd filling sidewalk and roadway, silent, going up, going down, between upstanding banks of brilliant lights, each building braided and embossed with glowing, many-colored bulbs of man-rayed luminance. A glowing valley of the shadow of life. The strolling crowd went slowly by through the kinematically divine thoroughfare of New York.

The world's a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed

There is none to tell the rich to go on striving, for a rich man makes the law that hallows and hollows his own life.

There's no reason to bring religion into it. I think we ought to have as great a regard for religion as we can, so as to keep it out of as many things as possible.

Wealth often takes away chances from men as well as poverty. There is none to tell the rich to go on striving, for a rich man makes the law that hallows and hollows his own life.

Laughter is wine for the soul - laughter soft, or loud and deep, tinged through with seriousness - the hilarious declaration made by man that life is worth living.

Laughter is wine for the soul ? laughter soft, or loud and deep, tinged through with seriousness. Comedy and tragedy step through life together, arm in arm, all along, out along, down along lea. A laugh is a great natural stimulator, a pushful entry into life; and once we can laugh, we can live. It is the hilarious declaration made by man that life is worth living.

Money does not make you happy but it quiets the nerves

No man is so old as to believe he cannot live one more year.

Politics has slain its thousands, but religion has slain its ten thousands.

She dresses herself to keep him with her, but it's no use ? after a month or two, th'wonder of a woman wears off.

The drama's altar isn't on the stage: it is candle-sticked and flowered in the box office. There is the gold, though there be no frankincense or myrrh; and the gospel for the day always The Play will Run for a Year. The Dove of Inspiration, of the desire for inspiration, has flown away from it; and on it's roof, now, the commonplace crow caws candidly.

The flame from the angel's sword in the garden of Eden has been catalyzed into the atom bomb; God's thunderbolt became blunted, so man's thunderbolt has become the steel star of destruction.

The hallway of every man's life is paced with pictures; pictures gay and pictures gloomy, all useful, for if we be wise, we can learn from them a richer and braver way to live.

The military mind is indeed a menace. Old-fashioned futurity that sees only men fighting and dying in smoke and fire; hears nothing more civilized than a cannonade; scents nothing but the stink of battle-wounds and blood.

Isn't all religions curious? If they weren't you wouldn't get anyone to believe them.

A man should always be drunk, Minnie, when he talks politics ? it's the only way in which to make them important.

It's I who know that well: when it was dark, you always carried the sun in your hand for me.

A sober black shawl hides her body entirely touched by the sun and the salt spray of the sea but down in the darkness a slim hand so lovely carries a rich bunch of red roses for me. Her petticoat simple and her feet are but bare and all that she has is but neat and scanty but stars in the deep of her eyes are exclaiming I carry a rich bunch of red roses for thee. No arrogant gem sits enthroned on her forehead or swings from a white ear for all men to see but jeweled desire in a bosom so pearly carries a rich bunch of red roses for me.

Author Picture
First Name
Seán
Last Name
O'Casey
Birth Date
1884
Death Date
1964
Bio

Irish Playwright, Dramatist, Socialist and Memoirist