Sigmund Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud

Sigmund
Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud
1856
1939

Austrian Psychologist, Neurologist, Originator of Psychoanalysis

Author Quotes

The doctor should be opaque to his patients and, like a mirror, should show them nothing but what is shown to him.

The interpretation of dreams is the royal road to a knowledge of the unconscious activities of the mind.

The psychic development of the individual is a short repetition of the course of development of the race.

These patients have turned away from outer reality; it is for this reason that they are more aware than we of inner reality and can reveal to us things which without them would remain impenetrable.

We are our desires.

When inspiration does not come to me, I go halfway to meet it.

The dream unites the grossest contradictions, permits impossibilities, sets aside the knowledge that influences us by day, and exposes us as ethically and morally obtuse.

The liberty of the individual is no gift of civilization. It was greatest before there was any civilization.

The psychical is not necessarily in reality what it appears to us to be.

Thinking is an experimental dealing with small quantities of energy, just as a general moves miniature figures over a map before setting his troops in action.

We are so constituted that we can gain intense pleasure only from the contrast, and only very little from the condition itself.

When making a decision of minor importance, I have always found it advantageous to consider all the pros and cons. In vital matters, however, such as the choice of a mate or a profession, the decision should come from the unconscious, from somewhere within ourselves. In the important decisions of personal life, we should be governed, I think, by the deep inner needs of our nature.

The ego is not master in its own house.

The madman is a dreamer awake

The psychical, whatever its nature may be, is itself unconscious.

This is one race of people for whom psychoanalysis is of no use whatsoever.

We are threatened with suffering from three directions: from our own body, which is doomed to decay and dissolution and which cannot even do without pain and anxiety as warning signals; from the external world, which may rage against us with overwhelming and merciless forces of destruction; and finally from our relations to other men. The suffering which comes from this last source is perhaps more painful than any other.

When someone abuses me I can defend myself, but against praise I am defenseless.

The ego refuses to be distressed by the provocations of reality, to let itself be compelled to suffer. It insists that it cannot be affected by the traumas of the external world; it shows, in fact, that such traumas are no more than occasions for it to gain pleasure.

The mind is like an iceberg, it floats with one-seventh of its bulk above water.

The psychoanalysis of individual human beings, however, teaches us with quite special insistence that the god of each of them is formed in the likeness of his father, that his personal relation to God depends on his relation to his father in the flesh and oscillates and changes along with that relation, and that at bottom God is nothing other than an exalted father.

Thought is action in rehearsal.

We believe that civilization has been created under the pressure of the exigencies of life at the cost of satisfaction of the instincts.

When the wayfarer whistles in the dark, he may be disavowing his timidity, but he does not see any more clearly for doing so.

The ego represents what we call reason and sanity, in contrast to the id which contains the passions.

Author Picture
First Name
Sigmund
Last Name
Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud
Birth Date
1856
Death Date
1939
Bio

Austrian Psychologist, Neurologist, Originator of Psychoanalysis