Sigmund Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud

Sigmund
Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud
1856
1939

Austrian Psychologist, Neurologist, Originator of Psychoanalysis

Author Quotes

Wit is the best safety valve modern man has evolved; the more civilization, the more repression, the more the need there is for wit.

The aim of all life is death.

The fateful question for the human species seems to me to be whether and to what extent their cultural development will succeed in mastering the disturbance of their communal life by the human instinct of aggression and self-destruction … One thing only do I know for certain and that is that man's judgments of value follow directly from his wishes for happiness—that, accordingly, they are an attempt to support his illusions with arguments.

The only bodily organ which is really regarded as inferior is the atrophied penis, a girl's clitoris.

The tendency of aggression is an innate, independent, instinctual disposition in man... it constitutes the most powerful obstacle to culture.

To love and to work.

We may lay it down that a happy person never phantasises, only an unsatisfied one... The motive forces of phantasies are unsatisfied wishes, and every single phantasy is the fulfilment of a wish, a correction of unsatisfying reality. These motivating wishes vary according to the sex, character and circumstances of the person who is having the phantasy; but they fall naturally into two main groups. They are either ambitious wishes, which serve to elevate the subject's personality; or they are erotic ones. It was shocking when Nietzsche said this, but today it is commonplace; our historical position—and no end to it is in sight—is that of having to philosophise without 'foundations'.

Woe to you, my Princess, when I come... you shall see who is the stronger, a gentle girl who doesn't eat enough or a big wild man who has cocaine in his body.

The analytic psychotherapist thus has a threefold battle to wage -- in his own mind against the forces which seek to drag him down from the analytic level; outside the analysis, against opponents who dispute the importance he attaches to the sexual instinctual forces and hinder him from making use of them in his scientific technique; and inside the analysis, against his patients, who at first behave like opponents but later on reveal the overvaluation of sexual life which dominates them, and who try to make him captive to their socially untamed passion.

The first human being who hurled an insult instead of a stone was the founder of civilization.

The only thing about masturbation to be ashamed of is doing it badly.

The time comes when each one of us has to give up as illusions the expectations which, in his youth, he pinned upon his fellow-men, and when he may learn how much difficulty and pain has been added to his life by their ill-will.

Toward the person who has died we adopt a special attitude: something like admiration for someone who has accomplished a very difficult task.

We must reckon with the possibility that something in the nature of the sexual instinct itself is unfavorable to the realization of complete satisfaction.

Woman, whom culture has burdened with the heavier load (especially in propagation) ought to be judged with tolerance and forbearance in areas where she has lagged behind man.

The behavior of a human being in sexual matters is often a prototype for the whole of his other modes of reaction in life.

The first request of civilization ... is that of justice.

The only unnatural sexual behavior is none at all.

The true believer is in a high degree protected against the danger of certain neurotic afflictions, by accepting the universal neorosis he is spared the task of forming a personal neurosis.

Towards the outside, at any rate, the ego seems to maintain clear and sharp lines of demarcation. There is only one state — admittedly an unusual state, but not one that can be stigmatized as pathological — in which it does not do this. At the height of being in love the boundary between ego and object threatens to melt away.

We obtain our concept of the unconscious, therefore, from the theory of repression … We see, however that we have two kinds of unconscious — that which is latent but capable of becoming conscious, and that which is repressed and not capable of becoming conscious in the ordinary way.

Words have a magical power. They can bring either the greatest happiness or deepest despair; they can transfer knowledge from teacher to student; words enable the orator to sway his audience and dictate its decisions. Words are capable of arousing the strongest emotions and prompting all men's actions.

The child takes his play very seriously and he expends large amounts of emotion on it. The opposite of play is not what is serious but what is real.

The goal of all life is death.

The paranoid is never entirely mistaken.

Author Picture
First Name
Sigmund
Last Name
Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud
Birth Date
1856
Death Date
1939
Bio

Austrian Psychologist, Neurologist, Originator of Psychoanalysis