Sigmund Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud

Sigmund
Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud
1856
1939

Austrian Psychologist, Neurologist, Originator of Psychoanalysis

Author Quotes

The unconscious is the larger circle which includes within itself the smaller circle of the conscious; everything conscious has its preliminary step in the unconscious, whereas the unconscious may stop with this step and still claim full value as a psychic activity. Properly speaking, the unconscious is the real psychic; its inner nature is just as unknown to us as the reality of the external world, and it is just as imperfectly reported to us through the data of consciousness as is the external world through the indications of our sensory organs.

Two hallmarks of a healthy life are the abilities to love and to work. Each requires imagination.

What do women want, my God, what do they want? What does a woman want.

Yes, America is gigantic, but a gigantic mistake.

He does not believe that does not live according to his belief .

I do not think our successes can compete with those of Lourdes. There are so many more people who believe in the miracles of the Blessed Virgin than in the existence of the unconscious.

In fact 'inferiority complex' is a technical term that is scarcely used in psycho-analysis. For us it does not bear the meaning of anything simple, let alone elementary. To trace it back to the self-perception of possible organic defects, as the school of what are known as 'Individual Psychologists' likes to do, seems to us a short-sighted error. The sense of inferiority has strong erotic roots. A child feels inferior if he notices that he is not loved, and so does an adult. The only bodily organ which is really regarded as inferior is the atrophied penis, a girl's clitoris. But the major part of the sense of inferiority derives from the ego's relation to its super-ego; like the sense of guilt it is an expression of the tension between them. Altogether, it is hard to separate the sense of inferiority and the sense of guilt. It would perhaps be right to regard the former as the erotic complement to the moral sense of inferiority.

It goes without saying that a civilization which leaves so large a number of its participants unsatisfied and drives them into revolt neither has nor deserves the prospect of a lasting existence.

Just as no one can be forced into belief, so no one can be forced into unbelief.

Most people do not really want freedom, because freedom involves responsibility, and most people are frightened of responsibility.

One feels inclined to say that the intention that man should be 'happy' is not included in the plan of Creation.' . . . We are so made that we can derive intense enjoyment only from a contrast and very little from a state of things.

Religion... comprises a system of wishful illusions together with a disavowal of reality, such as we find in an isolated form nowhere else but in amentia, in a state of blissful hallucinatory confusion.

He that has eyes to see and ears to hear may convince himself that no mortal can keep a secret. If his lips are silent, he chatters with his fingertips; betrayal oozes out of him at every pore.

I have found little that is "good" about human beings on the whole. In my experience most of them are trash, no matter whether they publicly subscribe to this or that ethical doctrine or to none at all. That is something that you cannot say aloud, or perhaps even think.

In general people experience their present naively, as it were, without being able to form an estimate of its contents; they have first to put themselves at a distance from it — the present, that is to say, must have become the past — before it can yield points of vantage from which to judge the future.

It is a great injustice to persecute homosexuality as a crime, and cruelty too.

Knowledge is the intellectual manipulation of carefully verified observations.

Much of our highly valued cultural heritage has been acquired at the cost of sexuality.

One is very crazy when in love.

Religious doctrines ... are all illusions, they do not admit of proof, and no one can be compelled to consider them as true or to believe in them.

He transmuted his passion into inquisitiveness.

I have found little that is good about human beings. In my experience most of them are trash.

In human beings pure masculinity or femininity is not to be found either in a psychological or biological sense.

It is a mistake to believe that science consists in nothing but conclusively proved propositions, and it is unjust to demand that it should. It is a demand made by those who feel a craving for authority in some form to replace the religious: catechism by something else, even a scientific one.

Life as we find it is too hard for us; it entails too much pain, too many disappointments, impossible tasks. We cannot do without palliative remedies.

Author Picture
First Name
Sigmund
Last Name
Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud
Birth Date
1856
Death Date
1939
Bio

Austrian Psychologist, Neurologist, Originator of Psychoanalysis