Simonides, aka Simonedes of Ceos

Simonides, aka Simonedes of Ceos
c. 556 B.C.
468 B.C.

Greek Lyric Poet

Author Quotes

The city is the teacher of the man.

The gods do not fight against necessity.

There is no better test of a man's work than time, which also reveals the thoughts which lay hidden in his breast.

There's no joy even in beautiful Wisdom, unless one have holy Health.

We did not flinch but gave our lives to save Greece when her fate hung on a razor's edge.

Where as gold is the kindest of all hosts when it shines in the sky, it comes an evil guest unto those that receive it in their hand.

I have often regretted my speech, never my silence.

I praise and love all men who do no sin willingly; but with necessity even the gods do not contend.

If to die honorably is the greatest Part of virtue, for us fate's done her best. Because we fought to crown Greece with freedom We lie here enjoying timeless fame.

It is hard to be truly excellent, four-square in hand and foot and mind, formed without blemish.

Not even the gods war against necessity.

Of earth's goods, the best is a good wife; a bad, the bitterest curse of human life.

Painting is silent poetry, and poetry is painting with the gift of speech.

Painting is silent poetry, poetry is eloquent painting.

The city is the teacher of the man.

?Tis said that virtue dwells sublime on rugged cliffs, full hard to climb; but mortal ne?er her form may see, unless his restless energy breaks forth in sweat that gains the goal, the perfect manhood of the soul.

A man gains no possession better than a good woman, nothing more horrible than a bad one.

Go, tell the Spartans, stranger passing by that here, obedient to their laws, we lie. Stranger, go tell the men of Lacedaemon that we, who lie here, did as we were ordered. Stranger, bring the message to the Spartans that here we remain, obedient to their orders. Oh foreigner, tell the Lacedaemonians that here we lie, obeying those words.

Here lies Megistias, who died when the Medes crossed Spercheius' tide. A great seer, yet he scorned to save Himself, and shared the Spartans' grave.

We count it death to falter, not to die.

We did not flinch but gave our lives to save Greece when her fate hung on a razor's edge.

Whereas gold is the kindest of all hosts when it shines in the sky, it comes an evil guest unto those that receive it in their hand.

A bad, the bitterest curse of human life.

A man gains no possession better than a good woman, nothing more horrible than a bad one.

Dancing is silent poetry.

Author Picture
First Name
Simonides, aka Simonedes of Ceos
Birth Date
c. 556 B.C.
Death Date
468 B.C.
Bio

Greek Lyric Poet