Sitting Bull, aka Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake, born Hoka Psice

Sitting Bull, aka Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake, born Hoka Psice
c.1834
1890

Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux Chief and Holy Man who had premonition of defeating the cavalry which motivated his people to a major victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn

Author Quotes

We are an island of Indians in a lake of whites. We must stand together, or they will rub us out separately. These soldiers have come shooting; they want war. All right, we?ll give it to them!

We have plenty of game. We want no white men here. The Black Hills belong to me. If the whites try to take them, I will fight.

What treaties that the whites have kept, that the red man broken? Not one. What treaties that the white man gave to us they kept? Not one.

What white man can say I never stole his land or a penny of his money? Yet they say that I am a thief. What white woman, however lonely, was ever captive or insulted by me? Yet they say I am a bad Indian.

What white man has ever seen me drunk? Who has ever come to me hungry and left me unfed? Who has seen me beat my wives or abuse my children? What law have I broken?

What white woman, however lonely, was ever captive or insulted by me? Yet they say I am a bad Indian.

When I was a boy, the Sioux owned the world. The sun rose and set on their land; they sent ten thousand men to battle. Where are the warriors today? Who slew them? Where are our lands? Who owns them?

You come here to tell us lies, but we don't want to hear them. If we told you more, you would have paid no attention. That is all I have to say.

You think I am a fool, but you are a greater fool than I am.

It does not take many words to tell the truth.

This is a good day to die. Follow me!

It is through this mysterious power that we too have our being, and we therefore yield to our neighbors, even to our animal neighbors, the same right as ourselves to inhabit this vast land.

This nation is like a spring freshet; it overruns its banks and destroys all who are in its path.

Look at me, see if I am poor, or my people either. The whites may get me at last, as you say, but I will have good times till then. You are fools to make yourselves slaves to a piece of fat bacon, some hard-tack, and a little sugar and coffee.

Wakan Tanka, pity me. In the name of the nation, I offer You this pipe. Wherever the Sun, Moon, Earth, Four Winds, there You are always. Tuncosila, save the people, I beg You. We wish to live. Guard us against all misfortunes and calamities. Take pity.

I have killed, robbed, and injured too many white men to believe in a good peace. They are medicine, and I would eventually die a lingering death. I had rather die on the field of battle.

My Father has given me this nation, in protecting them I have a hard time.

I want to tell you that if the Great Spirit had chosen anyone to be the chief of this country, it is myself.

Now that we are poor, we are free. No white man controls our footsteps. If we must die, we die defending our rights.

I was very sorry when I found out that your intentions were good and not what I supposed they were.

Only seven years ago we made a treaty by which we were assured that the buffalo country should be left to us forever. Now they threaten to take that from us also.

I will remain what I am until I die, a hunter, and when there are no buffalo or other game I will send my children to hunt and live on prairie mice, for where an Indian is shut up in one place his body becomes weak.

Strangely enough, they have a mind to till the soil, and the love of possessions is a disease in them.

I wish all to know that I do not propose to sell any part of my country, nor will I have the whites cutting our timber along the rivers, more especially the oak. I am particularly fond of the little groves of oak trees. I love to look at them, and feel a reverence for them, because they endure the wintry storms and summer?s heat, and?not unlike ourselves?seem to thrive and flourish by them. One thing more: those forts filled with white soldiers must be abandoned; there is no greater source of trouble and grievance to my people.

The earth has received the embrace of the sun and we shall see the results of that love. He put in your heart certain wishes and plans; in my heart, he put other different desires.

Author Picture
First Name
Sitting Bull, aka Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake, born Hoka Psice
Birth Date
c.1834
Death Date
1890
Bio

Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux Chief and Holy Man who had premonition of defeating the cavalry which motivated his people to a major victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn