Sosan Zenji, aka Chien-chih Seng-Tsan or Ch'an Seng-ts'an

Sosan
Zenji, aka Chien-chih Seng-Tsan or Ch'an Seng-ts'an
606

Chinese Third Zen Patriarch, Poet who wrote Classic Zen Scripture “Hsin Hsin Ming” - "Verses on the Faith-Mind" - "The Book of Nothing", he initiated Tao-hsin (Dõshin) into the profound doctrines of zen

Author Quotes

When thought is in bondage the truth is hidden for everything is murky and unclear. And the burdensome practice of judging brings annoyance and weariness.

When thought objects vanish, the thinking subject vanishes as when the mind vanishes, objects vanish.

When you try to stop activity to achieve passivity your very effort fills you with activity.

When no discriminating thoughts arise the old mind ceases to exist.

When the deep meaning of things is not understood the mind's essential peace is disturbed to no avail.

When the mind exists undisturbed in the Way nothing in the world can offend.

What benefit can be derived from distinctions and separations?

When all things are seen equally the timeless Self-essence is reached. No comparisons or analogies are possible in this causeless, relationless state.

When love and hate are both absent everything becomes clear and undisguised.

There is one Dharma, not many; distinctions arise from the clinging needs of the ignorant.

Things are objects because of the subject (mind) the mind (subject) is such because of things (object).

To deny the reality of things is to miss their reality; to assert the emptiness of things is to miss their reality.

To live in this faith is the road to non-duality. Because the non-dual is one with the trusting mind.

To live in this realization is to be without anxiety about non-perfection.

To return to the root is to find the meaning but to pursue appearance is to miss the source.

To seek Mind with the (discriminating) mind is the greatest of all mistakes.

To set-up what you like against what you dislike is the disease of the mind.

To understand the mystery of this One essence is to be released from all entanglements.

Understand the relativity of these two and the basic reality: the unity of emptiness. In this Emptiness the two are indistinguishable and each contains in itself the whole world.

The more you talk and think about it the further astray you wander from the truth. Stop talking and thinking and there is nothing you will not be able to know.

The wise man strives to no goals but the foolish man fetters himself.

Gain and loss, right and wrong, such thoughts must finally be abolished at once.

If the eye never sleeps all dreams will naturally cease.

If the mind makes no discriminations the ten thousand things are as they are - of single essence.

If you do not discriminate between coarse and fine you will not be tempted to prejudice and opinion.

Author Picture
First Name
Sosan
Last Name
Zenji, aka Chien-chih Seng-Tsan or Ch'an Seng-ts'an
Death Date
606
Bio

Chinese Third Zen Patriarch, Poet who wrote Classic Zen Scripture “Hsin Hsin Ming” - "Verses on the Faith-Mind" - "The Book of Nothing", he initiated Tao-hsin (Dõshin) into the profound doctrines of zen