Steve Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs

Steve
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
1955
2011

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.

Author Quotes

Unfortunately, people are not rebelling against Microsoft. They don?t know any better.

We want to reinvent the phone. What's the killer app? The killer app is making calls! It's amazing how hard it is to make calls on most phones. We want to let you use contacts like never before - sync your iPhone with your PC or mac.

Unfortunately, that?s too rare a commodity. A lot of people in our industry haven?t had very diverse experiences. So they don?t have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one?s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

We?re gambling on our vision, and we would rather do that than make me, too products. Let some other companies do that. For us, it?s always the next dream.

We attract a different type of person?a person who doesn?t want to wait five or ten years to have someone take a giant risk on him or her. Someone who really wants to get in a little over his head and make a little dent in the universe.

We believe it's the biggest advance in animation since Walt Disney started it all with the release of Snow White 50 years ago.

We did not enter the search business. [Google] entered the phone business. Make no mistake they want to kill the iPhone. We won't let them.

We don?t get a chance to do that many things, and every one should be really excellent. Because this is our life. Life is brief, and then you die, you know? And we?ve all chosen to do this with our lives. So it better be damn good. It better be worth it.

We don't believe it's possible to protect digital content ... What's new is this amazingly efficient distribution system for stolen property called the Internet ? and no one's gonna shut down the Internet. And it only takes one stolen copy to be on the Internet. And the way we expressed it to them is: Pick one lock ? open every door. It only takes one person to pick a lock. Worst case: Somebody just takes the analog outputs of their CD player and rerecords it ? puts it on the Internet. You'll never stop that. So what you have to do is compete with it.

We had the hardware expertise, the industrial design expertise and the software expertise, including iTunes. One of the biggest insights we have was that we decided not to try to manage your music library on the iPod, but to manage it in iTunes. Other companies tried to do everything on the device itself and made it so complicated that it was useless.

These technologies can make life easier, can let us touch people we might not otherwise. You may have a child with a birth defect and be able to get in touch with other parents and support groups, get medical information, the latest experimental drugs. These things can profoundly influence life. I?m not downplaying that. But it?s a disservice to constantly put things in this radical new light ? that it?s going to change everything. Things don?t have to change the world to be important.

They are shamelessly copying us.[About Microsoft and the operating system which would be released as Vista]

Things don't have to change the world to be important.

The minute I dropped out (of college) I could stop taking the required classes that didn't interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

The most compelling reason for most people to buy a computer for the home will be to link it to a nationwide communications network. We're just in the beginning stages of what will be a truly remarkable breakthrough for most people -- as remarkable as the telephone.

The only problem with Microsoft is they just have no taste. They have absolutely no taste. And I don't mean that in a small way, I mean that in a big way, in the sense that they don't think of original ideas, and they don't bring much culture into their products.

The over-all point is that new technology will not necessarily replace old technology, but it will date it. By definition. Eventually, it will replace it. But it's like people who had black-and-white TVs when color came out. They eventually decided whether or not the new technology was worth the investment.

The people who are doing the work are the moving force behind the Macintosh. My job is to create a space for them, to clear out the rest of the organization and keep it at bay.

The people who built Silicon Valley were engineers. They learned business, they learned a lot of different things, but they had a real belief that humans, if they worked hard with other creative, smart people, could solve most of humankind's problems. I believe that very much.

The problem is I?m older now, I?m 40 years old, and this stuff doesn?t change the world. It really doesn?t.

The problem with the Internet startup craze isn?t that too many people are starting companies; it?s that too many people aren?t sticking with it. That?s somewhat understandable, because there are many moments that are filled with despair and agony, when you have to fire people and cancel things and deal with very difficult situations. That?s when you find out who you are and what your values are.

The reason we wouldn't make a seven-inch tablet isn't because we don't want to hit a price point, it's because we don't think you can make a great tablet with a seven-inch screen.

The design of the Mac wasn't what it looked like, although that was part of it. Primarily, it was how it worked. To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok what it's all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it.

The subscription model of buying music is bankrupt. I think you could make available the Second Coming in a subscription model and it might not be successful.

The desktop computer industry is dead. Innovation has virtually ceased. Microsoft dominates with very little innovation. That's over. Apple lost. The desktop market has entered the dark ages, and it's going to be in the dark ages for the next 10 years, or certainly for the rest of this decade.

Author Picture
First Name
Steve
Last Name
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
Birth Date
1955
Death Date
2011
Bio

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.