Steve Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs

Steve
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
1955
2011

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.

Author Quotes

Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is much better than two doubles.

Real artists ship.

Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country.? I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this.? It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can?t capture, and I found it fascinating. None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me.

Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.

Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it?s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.

So let's not use a stylus. We're going to use the best pointing device in the world. We're going to use a pointing device that we're all born with - born with ten of them. We're going to use our fingers. We're going to touch this with our fingers. And we have invented a new technology called multi-touch, which is phenomenal. It works like magic.

So we went to Atari and said, 'Hey, we've got this amazing thing, even built with some of your parts, and what do you think about funding us? Or we'll give it to you. We just want to do it. Pay our salary, we'll come work for you.' And they said, 'No.' So then we went to Hewlett-Packard, and they said, 'Hey, we don't need you. You haven't got through college yet.'

So when a good idea comes, you know, part of my job is to move it around, just see what different people think, get people talking about it, argue with people about it, get ideas moving among that group of 100 people, get different people together to explore different aspects of it quietly, and, you know ? just explore things.

So when these people sell out, even though they get fabulously rich, they're gypping themselves out of one of the potentially most rewarding experiences of their unfolding lives. Without it, they may never know their values or how to keep their newfound wealth in perspective.

Some people are saying that we ought to put an IBM PC on every desk in America to improve productivity. It won?t work. The special incantations you have to learn this time are the slash q-zs and things like that. The manual for WordStar, the most popular word-processing program, is 400 pages thick. To write a novel, you have to read a novel??one that reads like a mystery to most people. They?re not going to learn slash q-z any more than they?re going to learn Morse code. That is what Macintosh is all about.

Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it?s really how it works... Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it?s really how it works. The design of the Mac wasn?t what it looked like, although that was part of it. Primarily, it was how it worked. To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok [understand] what it?s all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it. Most people don?t take the time to do that.

People think focus means saying yes to the thing you?ve got to focus on. But that?s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I?m actually as proud of the things we haven?t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying no to 1,000 things.

Picasso had a saying. He said 'Good artists copy, great artists steal.' And we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas. ... I think part of what made the Macintosh great was that the people working on it were musicians and poets and artists and zoologists and historians who also happened to be the best computer scientists in the world.

My model for business is the Beatles. They were four guys who kept each other's kind of negative tendencies in check. They balanced each other and the total was greater than the sum of the parts. That's how I see business: great things in business are never done by one person, they're done by a team of people.

My position coming back to Apple was that our industry was in a coma. It reminded me of Detroit in the 70s, when American cars were boats on wheels.

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don?t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life?s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Nobody has tried to swallow us since I've been here. I think they are afraid how we would taste.

Now, I have something to tell you today. Mac OS X has been leading a secret double life ? for the past five years. There have been rumors to this effect... but this is Apple's campus in Cupertino ? let's zoom in on it ? in that building right there... we've had teams doing the just-in-case scenario; and our rules have been that our designs for OS X must be processor independent, and that every project must be built for both the Power PC and Intel processors. And so today for the first time, I can confirm the rumors that every release of OS X has been compiled for both Power PC and Intel ? this has been going on for the last five years. Just in case.

Now, we are selling over 5 million songs a day now. Isn't that unbelievable? That's 58 songs every second of every minute of every hour of every day.

OH WOW. OH WOW. OH WOW. [Last words October 5, 2011]

Older people sit down [at a computer] and ask, 'What is it?' But the child asks, 'What can I do with it?'

One of my role models is Bob Dylan. As I grew up, I learned the lyrics to all his songs and watched him never stand still. If you look at the artists, if they get really good, it always occurs to them at some point that they can do this one thing for the rest of their lives, and they can be really successful to the outside world but not really be successful to themselves. That?s the moment that an artist really decides who he or she is. If they keep on risking failure, they?re still artists. Dylan and Picasso were always risking failure. This Apple thing is that way for me. I don?t want to fail, of course. But even though I didn?t know how bad things really were, I still had a lot to think about before I said yes. I had to consider the implications for Pixar, for my family, for my reputation. I decided that I didn?t really care, because this is what I want to do. If I try my best and fail, well, I?ve tried my best.

Our DNA is as a consumer company - for that individual customer who's voting thumbs up or thumbs down. That's who we think about. And we think that our job is to take responsibility for the complete user experience. And if it's not up to par, it's our fault, plain and simply.

Our friends up north spend over five billion dollars on research and development and all they seem to do is copy Google and Apple.

Our goal is to make the best devices in the world, not to be the biggest.

Author Picture
First Name
Steve
Last Name
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
Birth Date
1955
Death Date
2011
Bio

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.