Steve Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs

Steve
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
1955
2011

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.

Author Quotes

If you want to live your life in a creative way, as an artist, you have to not look back too much. You have to be willing to take whatever you?ve done and whoever you were and throw them away.

If, for some reason, we make some big mistake and IBM wins, my personal feeling is that we are going to enter a computer Dark Ages for about twenty years.

I'll always stay connected with Apple. I hope that throughout my life I'll sort of have the thread of my life and the thread of Apple weave in and out of each other, like a tapestry. There may be a few years when I'm not there, but I'll always come back.

I was lucky -- I found what I loved to do early in life.

I was worth about over a million dollars when I was twenty-three and over ten million dollars when I was twenty-four, and over a hundred million dollars when I was twenty-five and it wasn't that important because I never did it for the money.

I would trade all of my technology for an afternoon with Socrates.

I?ll always stay connected with Apple. I hope that throughout my life I?ll sort of have the thread of my life and the thread of Apple weave in and out of each other, like a tapestry. There may be a few years when I?m not there, but I?ll always come back.

I?m an optimist in the sense that I believe humans are noble and honorable, and some of them are really smart. I have a very optimistic view of individuals. As individuals, people are inherently good. I have a somewhat more pessimistic view of people in groups. And I remain extremely concerned when I see what?s happening in our country, which is in many ways the luckiest place in the world. We don?t seem to be excited about making our country a better place for our kids.

I?m as proud of what we don?t do as I am of what we do.

I?m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.

I?m sorry, it?s true. Having children really changes your view on these things. We?re born, we live for a brief instant, and we die. It?s been happening for a long time. Technology is not changing it much ? if at all.

I?m the only person I know that?s lost a quarter of a billion dollars in one year. It?s very character-building.

I think the artistry is in having an insight into what one sees around them. Generally putting things together in a way no one else has before and finding a way to express that to other people who don?t have that insight.

I think we're having fun. I think our customers really like our products. And we're always trying to do better.

I thought deeply about this. I ended up concluding that the worst thing that could possibly happen as we get big and as we get a little more influence in the world is if we change our core values and start letting it slide, I can't do that. I'd rather quit.

I told [Bill Gates] I believed every word of what I said but that I should never have said it in public. I wish him the best, I really do. I just think he and Microsoft are a bit narrow. He?d be a broader guy if he had dropped acid once or gone off to an ashram when he was younger.

I want to put a ding in the universe.

I am saddened, not by Microsoft?s success ? I have no problem with their success. They?ve earned their success, for the most part. I have a problem with the fact that they just make really third-rate products.

I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to [learn calligraphy]. I learned about serif and sans-serif typefaces, about varying the space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful. Historical. Artistically subtle in a way that science can't capture. And I found it fascinating. None of this had any hope of any practical application in my life. But 10 years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would never have multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it's likely that no personal computer would have them.

I didn't see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

I don?t think I?ve ever worked so hard on something, but working on Macintosh was the neatest experience of my life. Almost everyone who worked on it will say that. None of us wanted to release it at the end. It was as though we knew that once it was out of our hands, it wouldn?t be ours anymore. When we finally presented it at the shareholders? meeting, everyone in the auditorium stood up and gave it a 5-minute ovation. What was incredible to me was that I could see the Mac team in the first few rows. It was as though none of us could believe that we?d actually finished it. Everyone started crying.

I don't think it's good that we're perceived as different. I think it's important we're perceived as MUCH BETTER. If being different is essential to doing that, then we have to do that, but if we could be much better without being different, that'd be fine with me. I want to be much better! I don't care about being different, but we'll have to be different in some ways to be much better.

I have a great respect for incremental improvement, and I've done that sort of thing in my life, but I've always been attracted to the more revolutionary changes. I don't know why. Because they're harder. They're much more stressful emotionally. And you usually go through a period where everybody tells you that you've completely failed.

I make 50 cents for showing up ... and the other 50 cents is based on my performance. [On his famous $1 annual salary]

I met Woz when I was 13, at a friend's garage. He was about 18. He was, like, the first person I met who knew more electronics than I did at that point. We became good friends, because we shared an interest in computer and we had a sense of humor. We pulled all kinds of pranks together.

Author Picture
First Name
Steve
Last Name
Jobs, fully Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs
Birth Date
1955
Death Date
2011
Bio

American Entrepreneur, Marketer, Designer, Inventor, Co-Founder and Chairman and CEO of Apple Inc., CEO and Co-Founder of Pixar Animation Studios, CEO and Founder of NeXT Inc.