T. S. Eliot, fully Thomas Sterns Eliot

T. S.
Eliot, fully Thomas Sterns Eliot
1888
1965

American-born English Poet, Playwright, and Literary Critic

Author Quotes

So I find words I never thought to speak in streets I never thought I should revisit when I left my body on a distant shore.

That meddling in other people's affairs...formerly conducted by the most discreet intrigue is now openly advocated under the name of intervention.

The end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we know we started and know the place for the first time.

The only wisdom we can hope to acquire Is the wisdom of humility: humility is endless. The houses are all gone under the sea. The dancers are all gone under the hill.

The work of creation is never without travail.

These fragments I have shored against my ruins

Till Human voices wake us, and we drown.

Two people who know they do not understand each other, breeding children whom they do not understand and who will never understand them.

We have lingered in the chambers of the sea by sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown till human voices wake us... and we drown.

What life have you, if you have not life together?

Wipe your hand across your mouth, and laugh;

Your shadow at morning striding behind you.

It is impossible to say just what I mean!

Life is long between the desire and the spasm.

My life is light, waiting for the death wind, like a feather on the back of my hand.

Now that the lilacs are in bloom she has a bowl of lilacs in her room.

Our difficulties of the moment must always be dealt with somehow, but our permanent difficulties are difficulties of every moment.

Poetry should help, not only to refine the language of the time, but to prevent it from changing too rapidly.

So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.

That was my way of putting it-not very satisfactory: A periphrastic study in a worn-out poetical fashion, Leaving one still with the intolerable wrestle With words and meanings.

The endless cycle of idea and action, endless invention, endless experiment, brings knowledge of motion, but not of stillness; knowledge of speech, but not of silence; knowledge of words, and ignorance of the Word. All our knowledge brings us nearer to our ignorance, all our ignorance brings us nearer to death, but nearness to death no nearer to God. Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? The cycles of Heaven in twenty centuries bring us farther from God and nearer to the Dust.

The overwhelming pressure of mediocrity, sluggish and indomitable as a glacier, will mitigate the most violent, and depress the most exalted revolution.

The world revolves like ancient women, gathering fuel in vacant lots.

They don't understand what it is to be awake, to be living on several planes at once though one cannot speak with several voices at once.

Time for you and time for me, and time yet for a hundred indecisions, and for a hundred visions and revisions, before the taking of a toast and tea.

Author Picture
First Name
T. S.
Last Name
Eliot, fully Thomas Sterns Eliot
Birth Date
1888
Death Date
1965
Bio

American-born English Poet, Playwright, and Literary Critic