Temple Grandin, fully Mary Temple Grandin

Temple
Grandin, fully Mary Temple Grandin
1947

American Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, Author, Autistic Activist, Consultant to Livestock Industry

Author Quotes

I had people in my life who didn't give up on me: my mother, my aunt, my science teacher. I had one-on-one speech therapy. I had a nanny who spent all day playing turn-taking games with me.

I had problems getting my words out. If people spoke directly to me, I understood what they said. But when the grownups got to yakking really fast by themselves, it just sounded like 'oi oi.' I thought grownups had a separate language. I've now figured out I was not hearing the hard consonant sounds.

I have been on the same dose of anti-depressants for 15 years, and my nerves still go up and down in cycles; but my nerves are cycling at a lower level than they were before.

I have been talking and writing about sensory problems for over 20 years, and am still perplexed by many people who do not acknowledge sensory issues and the pain and discomfort they can cause. A person doesn't have to be on the autism spectrum to be affected by sensory issues.

I know a number of autistic adults that are doing extremely well on Prozac.

I like the really logical way that I think. I'm totally logical. In fact, it kind of blows my mind how irrational human beings are," she said. "If you totally got rid of autism, you'd have nobody to fix your computer in the future.

I believe there is a reason such as autism, severe manic-depression, and schizophrenia remain in our gene pool even though there is much suffering as a result.

I believe that the place where an animal dies is a sacred one. There is a need to bring ritual into the conventional slaughter plants and use as a means to shape people's behavior. It would help prevent people from becoming numbed, callous, or cruel. The ritual could be something very simple, such as a moment of silence. In addition to developing better designs and making equipment to insure the humane treatments of all animals, that would be my contribution.

Children who seek deep pressure by rolling up in blankets or who get under mattresses are the ones most likely to benefit from deep pressure. In small children, deep pressure can be easily applied by rolling a child in heavy mats or getting under bean bag chairs. In many individuals, the squeeze machine or other devices that apply pressure are calming. Deep pressure is most effective when it is applied for 20 minutes and then removed for 20 minutes. Kids that like to swing may benefit from it. Some children may be able to speak more easily while they are doing slow swinging or sitting balancing on an exercise ball. Weighted vests help some children and do not work for others.

Computerized medical records will enable statistical analysis to be used to determine which treatments are most effective.

Costs for liability insurance are higher than costs for many procedures. There is a need to reform liability laws to stop out-of-control health care costs.

Different not less.

Fieldwork is probably always more likely to be holistic than lab work or mathematical modeling because in the field you can?t get away from the whole when a research project starts.

For some individuals with autism, sensory therapies are very beneficial. Autism is highly variable and a sensory therapy that works well for one child may have no effect on another. Some of the most common sensory therapies are the use of deep pressure for calming, slow swinging, heavy work activities, and the brushing method. Sensory therapies performed by an occupational therapist can help some children to be calmer, more attentive and may aid in speech development.

From a scientific standpoint, Aspergers and autism are one syndrome. Aspergers is part of the autism spectrum, not a separate disorder.

I am a big believer in early intervention.

I am also a believer in an integrated treatment approach to autism.

I am different, not less.

I am much less autistic now, compared to when I was young. I remember some behaviors like picking carpet fuzz and watching spinning plates for hours. I didn't want to be touched. I couldn't shut out background noise. I didn't talk until I was about 4 years old. I screamed. I hummed. But as I grew up, I improved.

I believe that the best way to create good living conditions for any animal, whether it's a captive animal living in a zoo, a farm animal or a pet, is to base animal welfare programs on the core emotion systems in the brain. My theory is that the environment animals live in should activate their positive emotions as much as possible, and not activate their negative emotions any more than necessary. If we get the animal's emotions rights, we will have fewer problem behaviors... All animals and people have the same core emotion systems in the brain.

Children in my generation when they were teenagers they had jobs and learned how to work. I cleaned horse stalls," she said. "When I was 8 years old, my mother made me be a party hostess - shake hands, take coats. In the 1950s, social skills were taught in a much more rigid way so kids who were mildly autistic were forced to learn them. It hurts the autistic much more than it does the normal kids to not have these skills formally taught

Children who are visual thinkers will often be good at drawing, other arts, and building things with building toys such as Legos.

But my favorite of Einstein's words on religion is Science without religion is lame. Religion without science is blind. I like this because both science and religion are needed to answer life's great questions.

Children between the ages of five to ten years are even more variable. They are going to vary from very high functioning, capable of doing normal school work, to nonverbal who have all kinds of neurological problems.

Autism is a neurological disorder. It's not caused by bad parenting. It's caused by, you know, abnormal development in the brain. The emotional circuits in the brain are abnormal. And there also are differences in the white matter, which is the brain's computer cables that hook up the different brain departments.

Author Picture
First Name
Temple
Last Name
Grandin, fully Mary Temple Grandin
Birth Date
1947
Bio

American Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University, Author, Autistic Activist, Consultant to Livestock Industry