Tyron Edwards

Tyron
Edwards
1809
1894

American Theologian best known for compiling "A Dictionary of Thoughts"

Author Quotes

What we need in religion, is not new light, but new sight; not new paths, but new strength to walk in the old ones; not new duties, but new strength from on high to fulfill those that are plain before us.

There is nothing so elastic as the human mind. Like imprisoned steam, the more it is pressed the more it rises to resist the pressure. The more we are obliged to do the more we are able to accomplish.

Think as well as read, and when you read. Yield not your minds to the passive impressions which others may make upon them. Hear what they have to say; but examine it, weight it, and judge for yourselves. This will enable you to make a right use of books - to use them as helpers, not as guides to your understanding; as counselors, not as dictators of what you are to think and believe.

Thoroughly to teach another is the best way to learn for yourself.

Thoroughly to teach another is the best way to learn yourself.

To rejoice in another's prosperity, is to give content to your own lot; to mitigate another's grief, is to alleviate or dispel your own.

To rule one's anger is well; to prevent it is still better.

To waken interest and kindle enthusiasm is the sure way to teach easily and successfully.

True conservatism is substantial progress; it holds fast what is true and good in order to advance in both. To cast away the old is not of necessity to attain the new. To reject anything that is valuable, lessens the power of gaining more. That a thing is new does not of course commend; that it is old does not discredit. The test question is, "Is it true or good?"

True religion extends alike to the intellect and the heart. Intellect is in vain if it lead not to emotion, and emotion is vain if not enlightened by intellect; and both are vain if not guided by truth and leading to duty.

We should be as careful of the books we read, as of the company we keep. The dead very often have more power than the living.

We weep over the graves of infants and the little ones taken from us by death; but an early grave may be the shortest way to heaven.

Always have a book at hand, in the parlor, on the table, for the family; a book of condensed thought and striking anecdote, of sound maxims and truthful apothegms. It will impress on your mind a thousand valuable suggestions, and teach your children lessons of truth and duty. Such a book is a casket of jewels for your household.

It was said of one of the most intelligent men who ever lived in New England, that when asked how he came to know so much about everything, he replied, by constantly realizing my own ignorance, and never being afraid or ashamed to ask questions.

The benefit of proverbs, or maxims, is that they separate those who act on principle from those who act on impulse; and they lead to promptness and decision in acting. Their value deepens on four things; do they embody correct principles; are they on important subjects; what is the extent, and what is the ease of their application?

Bad books are like intoxicating drinks; they furnish neither nourishment, nor medicine. Both improperly excite; the one the mind; the other by body. The desire for each increases by being fed. Both ruin; one the intellect; the other the health; and together, the soul. The safeguard against each is the same - total abstinence from all that intoxicates either body or mind.

Most of our censure of others is only oblique praise of self, uttered to show the wisdom and superiority of the speaker. It has all the invidiousness of self-praise, and all the ill-desert of falsehood.

The highest attainment, as well as enjoyment of the spiritual life, is to be able at all times and in all things to say "Thy will be done."

Change of opinion is often only the progress of sound thought and growing knowledge; and though sometimes regarded as an inconsistency, it is but the noble inconsistency natural to a mind ever ready for growth and expansion of thought, and that never fears to follow where truth and duty may lead the way.

Mystery is but another name for our ignorance; if we were omniscient, all would be perfectly plain.

The object of punishment is threefold: for just retribution; for the protection of society; for the reformation of the offender.

Contemplation is to knowledge, what digestion is to food - the way to get life out of it.

Nature and revelation are alike God's books; each may have mysteries, but in each there are plain practical lessons for everyday duty.

The power of little things has so often been noted that we accept it as an axiom, and yet fail to see, in each beginning, the possibility of great events.

Doubt, indugled and cherished, is in danger of becoming denial; but if honest, and bent on thorough investigation, it may soon lead to dull establishment in the truth

Author Picture
First Name
Tyron
Last Name
Edwards
Birth Date
1809
Death Date
1894
Bio

American Theologian best known for compiling "A Dictionary of Thoughts"