Tyron Edwards

Tyron
Edwards
1809
1894

American Theologian best known for compiling "A Dictionary of Thoughts"

Author Quotes

He that resolves upon any great and good end, has, by the very resolution, scaled the chief barrier to it. He will find such resolution removing difficulties, searching out or making means, giving courage for despondency, and strength for weakness and like the star to the wise men of old, ever guiding him nearer and nearer to perfection.

Seek happiness for its own sake, and you will not find it; seek for duty, and happiness will follow as the shadow comes with the sunshine.

He who can suppress a moment's anger may prevent a day of sorrow.

Sense, brevity, and point are the elements of a good proverb.

Hell is truth seen too late - duty neglected in its season.

Sin with the multitude, and your responsibility and guilt are as great and as truly personal, as if you alone had done the wrong.

If you would thoroughly know anything, teach it to others.

Sinful and forbidden pleasures are like poisoned bread; they may satisfy appetite for the moment, but there is death in them at the end.

A holy life is not an ascetic, or gloomy, or solitary life, but a life regulated by divine truth and faithful in Christian duty. It is living above the world while we are still in it.

Imperfect knowledge is the parent of doubt: thorough and honest research dispels it.

Some men are born old, and some never seem so. If we keep well and cheerful we are always young, and at last die in youth, even when years would count us old.

Age does not depend upon years, but upon temperament and health. Some men are old, and some never grow so.

It is not true that there are no enjoyments in the ways of sin; there are, many and various. But the great and radical defect of them all is, that they are transitory and insubstantial, at war with reason and conscience, and always leave a sting behind... They may and often do satisfy us for a moment; but it is death in the end. It is the bread of heaven and the water of life that can so satisfy that we shall hunger no more and thirst no more forever.

Temperance is to the body what religion is to the soul, the foundation and source of health and strength and peace.

Always have a book at hand, in the parlor, on the table, for the family; a book of condensed thought and striking anecdote, of sound maxims and truthful apothegms. It will impress on your mind a thousand valuable suggestions, and teach your children lessons of truth and duty. Such a book is a casket of jewels for your household.

It was said of one of the most intelligent men who ever lived in New England, that when asked how he came to know so much about everything, he replied, by constantly realizing my own ignorance, and never being afraid or ashamed to ask questions.

The benefit of proverbs, or maxims, is that they separate those who act on principle from those who act on impulse; and they lead to promptness and decision in acting. Their value deepens on four things; do they embody correct principles; are they on important subjects; what is the extent, and what is the ease of their application?

Bad books are like intoxicating drinks; they furnish neither nourishment, nor medicine. Both improperly excite; the one the mind; the other by body. The desire for each increases by being fed. Both ruin; one the intellect; the other the health; and together, the soul. The safeguard against each is the same - total abstinence from all that intoxicates either body or mind.

Most of our censure of others is only oblique praise of self, uttered to show the wisdom and superiority of the speaker. It has all the invidiousness of self-praise, and all the ill-desert of falsehood.

The highest attainment, as well as enjoyment of the spiritual life, is to be able at all times and in all things to say "Thy will be done."

Change of opinion is often only the progress of sound thought and growing knowledge; and though sometimes regarded as an inconsistency, it is but the noble inconsistency natural to a mind ever ready for growth and expansion of thought, and that never fears to follow where truth and duty may lead the way.

Mystery is but another name for our ignorance; if we were omniscient, all would be perfectly plain.

The object of punishment is threefold: for just retribution; for the protection of society; for the reformation of the offender.

Contemplation is to knowledge, what digestion is to food - the way to get life out of it.

Nature and revelation are alike God's books; each may have mysteries, but in each there are plain practical lessons for everyday duty.

Author Picture
First Name
Tyron
Last Name
Edwards
Birth Date
1809
Death Date
1894
Bio

American Theologian best known for compiling "A Dictionary of Thoughts"