Tyron Edwards

Tyron
Edwards
1809
1894

American Theologian best known for compiling "A Dictionary of Thoughts"

Author Quotes

Bad books are like intoxicating drinks; they furnish neither nourishment, nor medicine. Both improperly excite; the one the mind; the other by body. The desire for each increases by being fed. Both ruin; one the intellect; the other the health; and together, the soul. The safeguard against each is the same - total abstinence from all that intoxicates either body or mind.

Most of our censure of others is only oblique praise of self, uttered to show the wisdom and superiority of the speaker. It has all the invidiousness of self-praise, and all the ill-desert of falsehood.

The highest attainment, as well as enjoyment of the spiritual life, is to be able at all times and in all things to say "Thy will be done."

Change of opinion is often only the progress of sound thought and growing knowledge; and though sometimes regarded as an inconsistency, it is but the noble inconsistency natural to a mind ever ready for growth and expansion of thought, and that never fears to follow where truth and duty may lead the way.

Mystery is but another name for our ignorance; if we were omniscient, all would be perfectly plain.

The object of punishment is threefold: for just retribution; for the protection of society; for the reformation of the offender.

Contemplation is to knowledge, what digestion is to food - the way to get life out of it.

Nature and revelation are alike God's books; each may have mysteries, but in each there are plain practical lessons for everyday duty.

The power of little things has so often been noted that we accept it as an axiom, and yet fail to see, in each beginning, the possibility of great events.

Doubt, indugled and cherished, is in danger of becoming denial; but if honest, and bent on thorough investigation, it may soon lead to dull establishment in the truth

Our opinions on all subjects are more largely formed by our sympathies than by carefully sifted evidence.

The secret of a good memory is attention, and attention to a subject depends upon our interest in it. We rarely forget that which has made a deep impression on our minds.

Duty performed gives clearness and firmness to faith, and faith becomes the more assured and satisfying to the soul.

Prejudices are rarely overcome by argument; not being founded in reason they cannot be destroyed by logic.

Duty performed is a moral tonic; if neglected, the tone and strength of both mind and heart are weakened, and the spiritual health undermined.

Religion, in its purity, is not so much a pursuit as a temper; or rather it is a temper, leading to the pursuit of all that is high and holy. Its foundation is faith; its action, works; its tempter, holiness; its aim, obedience to God in improvement of self and benevolence to men.

Happiness is like manna; it is to be gathered in grains, and enjoyed every day. It will not keep; it cannot be accumulated; nor have we got to go out of ourselves or into remote places to gather it, since it has rained down from a Heaven, at our very door.

Ridicule may be the evidence of wit or bitterness and may gratify a little mind, or an ungenerous temper, but it is no test of reason and truth.

Have a time and place for everything, and do everything in its time and place, and you will not only accomplish more, but have far more leisure than those who are always hurrying, as if vainly attempting to overtake time that has been lost.

Right actions for the future are the best apologies for wrong ones in the past - the best evidence of regret for them that we can offer, or the world receives.

He that never changes his opinions, never corrects his mistakes, and will never be wiser on the morrow than he is to-day.

Science has sometimes been said to be opposed to faith, and inconsistent with it. But all science, in fact, rests on a basis of faith, for it assumes the permanence and uniformity of natural laws - a thing which can never be demonstrated

He that resolves upon any great and good end, has, by the very resolution, scaled the chief barrier to it. He will find such resolution removing difficulties, searching out or making means, giving courage for despondency, and strength for weakness and like the star to the wise men of old, ever guiding him nearer and nearer to perfection.

Seek happiness for its own sake, and you will not find it; seek for duty, and happiness will follow as the shadow comes with the sunshine.

He who can suppress a moment's anger may prevent a day of sorrow.

Author Picture
First Name
Tyron
Last Name
Edwards
Birth Date
1809
Death Date
1894
Bio

American Theologian best known for compiling "A Dictionary of Thoughts"